Jimmy Stewart: Bomber Pilotby Starr Smith, Walter Cronkite (Foreword by)

Overview
Of all the celebrities who served their country during World War II, Jimmy Stewart was unique. At the height of his fame, Jimmy Stewart enlisted in the army several months before the Pearl Harbor attacks woke Hollywood and the rest of the nation to the reality of war. “It’s a true story of personal knowledge,” writes Walter Cronkite in the foreword, “and is told with skill, respect, and admiration.” Author Starr Smith chronicles for the first time Stewart’s long journey to becoming a bomber pilot in combat, including:

· Stewart’s battles with the Air Corps high command
· His assignment to a Liberator squadron in England with the famed Mighty Eighth Air Force
· His twenty combat missions—including one to Berlin—in command of his own squadron in the 445th Bomb Group
· Later, Stewart’s promotion to group operations officer for the 453rd Bomb Group

Jimmy Stewart was a very interesting character, truly his story shows that Hollywood was once a different place with a much different class of people! A worthwhile read which will truly open your eyes about a man who went from thousands of dollars a month to $21/month. And he sought it! A rare breed of person.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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You Don’t Lose ‘Til You Quit Trying: Lessons on Adversity and Victory from a Vietnam Veteran and Medal of Honor Recipientby Sammy Lee Davis, Caroline Lambert, Gary Sinise (Foreword by)

The inspiring true life story of Vietnam veteran, Medal of Honor recipient, and veteran’s advocate Sammy Lee Davis.

On November 18, 1967, twenty-one-year-old Private First Class Davis’s artillery unit was hit by a massive enemy offensive. Soon he would have a perforated kidney, crushed ribs, a broken vertebra, ripped flesh from beehive darts, a bullet in his thigh, and burns all over his body. Ignoring his injuries, he manned a two-ton howitzer by himself, crossed a canal under heavy fire to rescue three wounded American soldiers, and kept fighting until the enemy retreated. His heroism that day earned him a Medal of Honor.

You Don’t Lose ’Til You Quit Trying chronicles how his childhood in the American heartland prepared him for the worst night of his life—and how that night set off a lifelong battle against debilitating injuries, the effects of Agent Orange, and an America that was turning on its veterans.

But he also battled for his fellow veterans, speaking on their behalf for forty years to help heal the wounds and memorialize the brotherhood that war could forge. Here, readers will learn of Sammy Davis’s extraordinary life—the courage, the pain, and the triumph.

An interesting story of a man who walked the path of the extraordinary. Many tips can be gleaned from this warrior. Vietnam changed a great any men, some for the better, others for the worse. He was one of the ones who overcame and conquered!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Rise of the Warrior Cop: The Militarization of America’s Police Forcesby Radley Balko

The last days of colonialism taught America’s revolutionaries that soldiers in the streets bring conflict and tyranny. As a result, our country has generally worked to keep the military out of law enforcement. But according to investigative reporter Radley Balko, over the last several decades, America’s cops have increasingly come to resemble ground troops. The consequences have been dire: the home is no longer a place of sanctuary, the Fourth Amendment has been gutted, and police today have been conditioned to see the citizens they serve as an other—an enemy.
Today’s armored-up policemen are a far cry from the constables of early America. The unrest of the 1960s brought about the invention of the SWAT unit—which in turn led to the debut of military tactics in the ranks of police officers. Nixon’s War on Drugs, Reagan’s War on Poverty, Clinton’s COPS program, the post–9/11 security state under Bush and Obama: by degrees, each of these innovations expanded and empowered police forces, always at the expense of civil liberties. And these are just four among a slew of reckless programs.
In Rise of the Warrior Cop, Balko shows how politicians’ ill-considered policies and relentless declarations of war against vague enemies like crime, drugs, and terror have blurred the distinction between cop and soldier. His fascinating, frightening narrative shows how over a generation, a creeping battlefield mentality has isolated and alienated American police officers and put them on a collision course with the values of a free society.

This was, without a doubt, a very eye opening read. With the present culture of today, the police have, in effect, become a standing army on American soil. This is not to say that there are not good cops, but they are becoming harder to find with the advent of such a strong law and nature of our representatives creating a force to be reckoned with in America! A worthy read and well worth the time!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Spirit Warriors: Strategies for the Battles Christian Men and Women Face Every Day by Stu Weber

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Pastor and former Green Beret captain Stu Weber reveals the crucial spiritual battles that all Christians face constantly, whether or not they are aware of them. “Somehow we have come to mistakenly associate spiritual warfare with charismatic personalities strutting across brightly lit platforms … whuppin’ up on evil spirits,” says Weber. “But spiritual warfare is so much more than a show.” With warm and winning counsel, the bestselling author/speaker warns of the very real perils readers face, giving them what they need to survive and thrive.

Paying attention to what is happening around you, daily, and to what the Word of God (Bible) is saying are two of the greatest elements to this present battle of Spiritual warfare. You MUST choose God’s word over the words of man. You MUST choose the full armor of God rather than the armor of this world…you will be severely unprepared.

A MUST read book with a MUST listen to message!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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pegasus

In the early morning hours of June 6, 1944, a small detachment of British airborne troops stormed the German defense forces and paved the way for the Allied invasion of Europe. Pegasus Bridge was the first engagement of D-Day, the turning point of World War II.

This gripping account of it by acclaimed author Stephen Ambrose brings to life a daring mission so crucial that, had it been unsuccessful, the entire Normandy invasion might have failed. Ambrose traces each step of the preparations over many months to the minute-by-minute excitement of the hand-to-hand confrontations on the bridge. This is a story of heroism and cowardice, kindness and brutality—the stuff of all great adventures.

Just one aspect of the D-Day invasion which was a turning point of the war, in some aspects. Well written and a short read. Something for a lazy day at home in order to learn a little bit more on the topic of World War II. Stephen Ambrose has numerous books, which he has written on the subject of topic : WWII. Check out some of his other books as well if you like this one…you will love BAND OF BROTHERS. Of course, there are other topics he has written on.

Godspeed and Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Killerbowl by Gary K. Wolf

Released by Doubleday on September 26, 1975
It’s thirty years in the future. The ultraviolent sport of Professional Street Football, a phenomenally popular 24-four-hour-long athletic event, combines pro football with mixed martial arts, armed combat, and street fighting. On New Years day, quarterback T.K. Mann plays the most dangerous game of his life, the game known as……Killerbowl!

While the novel is not my pick of choice, as I am more of a learner as opposed to imaginative reader. This was a staunch reminder of when I read ROLLERBALL, later to become a movie with James Caan. But a friend thought I would like this. Unfortunately not a big fan, but it was okay. It had taken me out of my norm and my comfort zone, as a matter of speaking. This is more for someone who truly appreciates this genre of book.

Godspeed & Good Read!

Doc Murf

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Angels: Ringing Assurance that We Are Not Alone by Billy Graham


Yes, angels are real. They are not the product of your imagination.

“If we had open spiritual eyes we would see not only a world filled with evil spirits and powers—but also powerful angels with drawn swords, set for our defense.”

—Billy Graham

Dr. Graham lifts the veil between the visible and the invisible world to give us an eye-opening account of these behind-the-scenes agents. This best-selling classic records the experiences of Dr. Graham and others who are convinced that at moments of special need they have been attended by angels. With keen insight and conviction, Dr. Graham affirms that:

God’s invisible hosts are better organized than any of the armies of man—or Satan.

Angels “think, feel, will, and display emotions.”

Angels guide, comfort, and provide for people in the midst of suffering and persecution.

At death, the faithful will be ushered by angels into the presence of God.

Truly, this book, gives one a much more in depth view of Angels. Man, upon receiving this knowledge, biblical or extra-biblical, definitely opens one’s eyes to a greater understanding of the topic subject. Adding much needed honoring of the Angel class of God’s creatures!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Five Years to Freedom: The True Story of a Vietnam POW by James N. Rowe

In 1963, Nick Rowe is with a group of Vietnamese soldiers on a routine mission when they encounter Vietcong soldiers. In the fight, Rowe and a fellow soldier are captured. Rowe realizes the seriousness of his situation but is unable to do anything about it immediately. As time passes, Rowe is often weakened and is constantly pushed to declare that the Vietcong are justified in all aspects of the war and that his own countrymen are wrong. Failure to do so continually prompts varying degrees of punishment. For five years his captors work to instill a series of propaganda statements into Rowe’s mind and Rowe continues to disbelieve his captors.
Rowe is a military man, having decided to attend West Point because his older brother was killed prior to his own graduation. Rowe is deployed to Vietnam without really knowing all the politics involved. Rowe comes to like many of the Vietnamese people and sometimes helps with distribution of medicine and other activities. After his capture, he becomes bombarded with information that the Vietnamese people as a whole support the Vietcong and that the American prisoners are in danger of being attacked by the general populace. After several years as a prisoner, he is taken on a tour of the region – ostensibly to see the true state of the people. He encounters some people who remember him from his days as a soldier so many years earlier. One risks punishment to touch Rowe on the shoulder and an elderly woman speaks up and questions the reason Rowe appears to be undernourished. Rowe leaves that situation and finds his resolve to remain strong against the pressure to admit to “crimes” against the Vietcong.

Rowe encounters several other prisoners during his time as a POW. Some of those survive and are released. Others die while Rowe watches, helpless to do anything to prevent it. He is held alone during his final months as a prisoner and he finds the situation initially frightening but then finds a new freedom in that he is no longer responsible for anyone else. When Rowe and his captors are fleeing American bombers, he arranges the opportunity to be alone with a single captor then hits the man over the hand to get away so that he can flag down a passing helicopter. His mother’s words, when she knows that he is safe, are, “What took you so long?”

Rowe is a strong person and remains so in the face of near-starvation and psychological torment. One of the most serious moments of torment for him comes when American bombers are striking the camp and he comes to fear that he’ll die at the hands of his own people.

This was a true eye opening and thought provoking book where you had to sense, see and feel what was happening around you. A mindfully written book that challenged you to feel for the POWs, what they were going through, how they were treated, etc. Was a person to die by sickness?..at the hands of the NVA?..or at the hands of his own people? A riveting book filled with questions, in some cases still not answered. War is hell, war sucks, and if more people understood the ramifications of war…there would be a movement by all people to stop war.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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HERSHEYMilton S. Hershey’s Extraordinary Life of Wealth, Empire, and Utopian Dreamsby Michael D’Antonio

The name Hershey evokes many things: chocolate bars, the company town in Pennsylvania, one of America’s most recognizable brands. But who was the man behind the name? In this compelling biography, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael D’Antonio gives us the real-life rags-to-riches story of Milton S. Hershey, a largely uneducated businessman whose idealistic sense of purpose created an immense financial empire, a town, and a legacy that lasts to this day.

A rathe good read concerning a man with a dream, a desire, a fire burning drive, and the faith to shoot for the stars. An interesting life, to say the least!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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30 Days to Understanding the Bible in 15 Minutes a Day: Expanded Edition Paperback by Max Anders

30-days-bible

30 Days to Understanding the Bible, the innovative teach-yourself guide that’s helped so many readers get more out of the Bible, just got even better! Now Max Anders’ remarkable resource for Bible learning is available in a new, expanded edition, with all the features that made the original so popular – plus much more.

Proven effective by over 200,000 readers, 30 Days to Understanding the Bible helps you learn to position key Bible characters, places, and events in chronological order so that you can “think your way through” the entire Word of God. Through interesting, memory-enhancing exercises, 30 Days to Understanding the Bible acquaints readers with the core teachings of Scripture in just 15 minutes a day!

Bible study leaders and Sunday school teachers will appreciate the new Teaching Plan with activities and directions for a 12-week group study, complete with overhead transparency masters for class or home group use.

This is an excellent resource for bible studying and understanding. Worthy of opening time-and-again. It will help with increased understanding and comprehension of the content within the two covers of your Holy Bible. It, could be, a great study, in itself, for the bible.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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