Monthly Archives: December 2016

Beyond Band of Brothers: The war memoirs of Major Dick Wintersby Dick Winters, Cole C. Kingseed

They were called Easy Company—but their mission was never easy. Immortalized as the Band of Brothers, they suffered 150% casualties while liberating Europe—an unparalleled record of bravery under fire. Dick Winters was their commander—”the best combat leader in World War II” to his men. This is his story—told in his own words for the first time.
On D-Day, Dick Winters parachuted into France and assumed leadership of the Band of Brothers when their commander was killed. He led them through the Battle of the Bulge and into Germany, by which time each member had been wounded. They liberated an S.S. death camp from the horrors of the Holocaust and captured Berchtesgaden, Hitler’s alpine retreat. After briefly serving during the Korean War, Winters was a highly successful businessman. Made famous by Stephen Ambrose’s book Band of Brothers—and the subsequent award-winning HBO miniseries—he is the object of worldwide adulation.

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This was, without doubt, a great companion book to “Band of Brothers”! While much of it was encompassed within the HBO mini series, some things were more informative about Dick Winters – the man. I loved his synopsis of leadership skills, and/or traits, LEADERSHIP AT THE POINT OF A BAYONET, which by the way was the last page of the book. Though, he spoke of the problem in his book, most war survivors do not speak of their time at war. My father included. I believe this to be a travesty to our kids, because our children should come to understand to ramification of war. Unfortunately, governments and others needing bodies for a war effort will tend to glorify and even romanticize by incorporating patriotism, but this is so far from the truth! Our children need to view things such as the HBO mini series, read books such as this, etc. in order to make an educated, eyes-wide-open decision to become part of the war effort. I learned a great deal from this book and the mini series; more than I did from my father. I did learn that my oldest sister knew more of what my father endured in the European theater during WWII than I had ever known. That tid-bit didn’t come until after my mother’s passing in 2012, he had passed away in 1989. I believe Abraham Lincoln said it best:

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There was a quote, not certain to whom it is attributed, but in essence: “If people knew what happened in time of war, there would be no more war!”

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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More Than a Hobby: How a $600 Startup Became America’s Home and Craft Superstore by David Green

more-than-a-hobby

The retail industry has undergone enormous changes during the last thirty years.

But there is one retailer that not only has remained consistent in the fluctuating?even tenuous?market, but also has grown in the process.

More Than a Hobby takes you inside the story of David Green, the man who built the phenomenal success of Hobby Lobby. Green went beyond surviving in a competitive retail market to thriving, ultimately expanding his $600 start-up company into a $1.3 billion per-year enterprise.

Green’s incredible accomplishments were based not on business-school theory but on his grassroots experiences as a store manager and his creative application of cutting edge ideas, including:

  • Allow managers to spend no more than thirty minutes per day on paperwork
  • Instead of paying a middleman, assemble as much of the product as possible in-house
  • Give buyers the freedom to purchase without restraint―but within the realm of common sense
  • Keep God and family first

More Than a Hobby is a practical field manual, filled with revolutionary ideas for all those who dream of success in the world of retail business.

David Green used very simplistic, easy to attain goals which permitted him to adhere to his faith, apply it daily, glorify God, and accomplish his goals! A short book, but well worth the read that is chock full of tidbits with long term life values. Worthy of applying within one’s own life!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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The Healing Handbook: An Essential Guide to Healing the Sick by Kynan Bridges

healing-handbook-bridges

Sickness is not God’s will… for you or for anyone else. According to the Bible, sickness is not a gift from Heaven—it is a result of sin, the Fall, and the curse. You are not called to accept or embrace it; you have been anointed to release God’s healing, deliverance, and freedom!

In The Healing Handbook, Pastor Kynan Bridges gives a fresh voice to this powerful ministry that every Christian gets to be a part of… this includes

you!

You’ll learn how to:

• Use Christ’s authority to experience victory over sickness

• Remove the barriers to receiving divine healing

• Activate your faith to release the supernatural power of God

• Walk in signs, wonders, and miracles on a regular basis

Don’t go a day longer without experiencing the miraculous gift that is living inside of you. Get ready to step into a new dimension and unleash God’s healing power in your life today!

While I do not normally read this kind of book, I must admit, I was drawn to it for several reasons. Kynan Bridges opened my eyed to several aspects of my Spiritual life where I was lacking! Namely: Faith and Belief…of all things. We, as the species of man, have this innate mindset where we design God and place Him into a box of our own making. This was, without a doubt, a great book to read and learn a thing or two…if you aren’t too closed minded? We have all done it and we continue to do such things that stagnate and hold back our faith and knowledge; as well as, other aspects of our lives! Make it a habit of breaking God out of the box into which you have placed Him.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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EVERYTHING WE HAD By Santoli, Al

In spite of its shortcomings, ”Everything We Had” – like ”Nam” – accomplishes what oral history is meant to do: It relates an event in the words of those who lived it. Books such as these, Mr. Baker writes, may be filled with ”generalizations, exaggerations, braggadocio and – very likely – outright lies.” But as he also notes, the ”human imperfections simply authenticate the sincerity of the whole.” By illuminating the horror that was the Vietnam war, both books may well help to break down some of the barriers between the Vietnam veteran and the American public.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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