Monthly Archives: June 2017

Killerbowl by Gary K. Wolf

Released by Doubleday on September 26, 1975
It’s thirty years in the future. The ultraviolent sport of Professional Street Football, a phenomenally popular 24-four-hour-long athletic event, combines pro football with mixed martial arts, armed combat, and street fighting. On New Years day, quarterback T.K. Mann plays the most dangerous game of his life, the game known as……Killerbowl!

While the novel is not my pick of choice, as I am more of a learner as opposed to imaginative reader. This was a staunch reminder of when I read ROLLERBALL, later to become a movie with James Caan. But a friend thought I would like this. Unfortunately not a big fan, but it was okay. It had taken me out of my norm and my comfort zone, as a matter of speaking. This is more for someone who truly appreciates this genre of book.

Godspeed & Good Read!

Doc Murf

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Angels: Ringing Assurance that We Are Not Alone by Billy Graham


Yes, angels are real. They are not the product of your imagination.

“If we had open spiritual eyes we would see not only a world filled with evil spirits and powers—but also powerful angels with drawn swords, set for our defense.”

—Billy Graham

Dr. Graham lifts the veil between the visible and the invisible world to give us an eye-opening account of these behind-the-scenes agents. This best-selling classic records the experiences of Dr. Graham and others who are convinced that at moments of special need they have been attended by angels. With keen insight and conviction, Dr. Graham affirms that:

God’s invisible hosts are better organized than any of the armies of man—or Satan.

Angels “think, feel, will, and display emotions.”

Angels guide, comfort, and provide for people in the midst of suffering and persecution.

At death, the faithful will be ushered by angels into the presence of God.

Truly, this book, gives one a much more in depth view of Angels. Man, upon receiving this knowledge, biblical or extra-biblical, definitely opens one’s eyes to a greater understanding of the topic subject. Adding much needed honoring of the Angel class of God’s creatures!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Five Years to Freedom: The True Story of a Vietnam POW by James N. Rowe

In 1963, Nick Rowe is with a group of Vietnamese soldiers on a routine mission when they encounter Vietcong soldiers. In the fight, Rowe and a fellow soldier are captured. Rowe realizes the seriousness of his situation but is unable to do anything about it immediately. As time passes, Rowe is often weakened and is constantly pushed to declare that the Vietcong are justified in all aspects of the war and that his own countrymen are wrong. Failure to do so continually prompts varying degrees of punishment. For five years his captors work to instill a series of propaganda statements into Rowe’s mind and Rowe continues to disbelieve his captors.
Rowe is a military man, having decided to attend West Point because his older brother was killed prior to his own graduation. Rowe is deployed to Vietnam without really knowing all the politics involved. Rowe comes to like many of the Vietnamese people and sometimes helps with distribution of medicine and other activities. After his capture, he becomes bombarded with information that the Vietnamese people as a whole support the Vietcong and that the American prisoners are in danger of being attacked by the general populace. After several years as a prisoner, he is taken on a tour of the region – ostensibly to see the true state of the people. He encounters some people who remember him from his days as a soldier so many years earlier. One risks punishment to touch Rowe on the shoulder and an elderly woman speaks up and questions the reason Rowe appears to be undernourished. Rowe leaves that situation and finds his resolve to remain strong against the pressure to admit to “crimes” against the Vietcong.

Rowe encounters several other prisoners during his time as a POW. Some of those survive and are released. Others die while Rowe watches, helpless to do anything to prevent it. He is held alone during his final months as a prisoner and he finds the situation initially frightening but then finds a new freedom in that he is no longer responsible for anyone else. When Rowe and his captors are fleeing American bombers, he arranges the opportunity to be alone with a single captor then hits the man over the hand to get away so that he can flag down a passing helicopter. His mother’s words, when she knows that he is safe, are, “What took you so long?”

Rowe is a strong person and remains so in the face of near-starvation and psychological torment. One of the most serious moments of torment for him comes when American bombers are striking the camp and he comes to fear that he’ll die at the hands of his own people.

This was a true eye opening and thought provoking book where you had to sense, see and feel what was happening around you. A mindfully written book that challenged you to feel for the POWs, what they were going through, how they were treated, etc. Was a person to die by sickness?..at the hands of the NVA?..or at the hands of his own people? A riveting book filled with questions, in some cases still not answered. War is hell, war sucks, and if more people understood the ramifications of war…there would be a movement by all people to stop war.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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