Category Archives: Biographies

Reagan: The Life by H.W. Brands

reagan

In his magisterial new biography, H. W. Brands brilliantly establishes Ronald Reagan as one of the two great presidents of the twentieth century, a true peer to Franklin Roosevelt. Reagan conveys with sweep and vigor how the confident force of Reagan’s personality and the unwavering nature of his beliefs enabled him to engineer a conservative revolution in American politics and play a crucial role in ending communism in the Soviet Union. Reagan shut down the age of liberalism, Brands shows, and ushered in the age of Reagan, whose defining principles are still powerfully felt today.

    Employing archival sources not available to previous biographers and drawing on dozens of interviews with surviving members of Reagan’s administration, Brands has crafted a richly detailed and fascinating narrative of the presidential years. He offers new insights into Reagan’s remote management style and fractious West Wing staff, his deft handling of public sentiment to transform the tax code, and his deeply misunderstood relationship with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, on which nothing less than the fate of the world turned.

     Reagan is a storytelling triumph, an irresistible portrait of an underestimated politician whose pragmatic leadership and steadfast vision transformed the nation.

Reagan was a great President with a practical outlook and plan of attack on the subjects at hand. While there were some low points in his tenure, there were some great accomplishments. He was a trusting man, but he was not a god (as so many speak of him as such.) Brands has definitely hit the nail squarely on the head with this book of his. It was a great read and the topic was on such a great person, in President Reagan.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

 

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, eBook, Education, Film, History, Issues, Law, Movie, News, Politics, Reading, Review

Righteous Indignation: Excuse Me While I Save the World! by Andrew Breitbart

RighteousIndignation

Known for his network of conservative websites that draws millions of readers everyday, Andrew Breitbart has one main goal: to make sure the “liberally biased” major news outlets in this country cover all aspects of a story fairly. Breitbart is convinced that too many national stories are slanted by the news media in an unfair way.

In RIGHTEOUS INDIGNATION, Breitbart talks about how one needs to deal with the liberal news world head on. Along the way, he details his early years, working with Matt Drudge, the Huffington Post, and how Breitbart developed his unique style of launching key websites to help get the word out to conservatives all over.

A rollicking and controversial read, Breitbart will certainly raise your blood pressure, one way or another.

********

I found this book to be extraordinarily written, in that it was aimed toward those people who need every possible aid in defending their view with respect to the Liberal Progressive mind set. If you are looking to get into the game, not necessarily politics or television or the media, but you are seeking a way to get your point across without giving up your ethics or moral standards. Many see themselves having to compromise in their morals or ethics, but you don’t.

Sadly, instead of having a discussion with some people actually becomes hard work when they have a Liberal, Progressive, Socialistic, or Communistic position. You do have to be a bit brash in order to get your point across, but do you actually think you will change their minds? Probably not, all you can hope for (from my experiences in evangelizing or witnessing to non-Christians) is to plant a seed in their minds.

Andrew Breitbart was a Liberal minded progressive person, by his own admission and by the indoctrination that he had gone throughout his schooling. But he was steered away from it through the ideas of others and began to think for himself. In his first chapter he showed that he repeated much of what he had been told and his mind was on autopilot…then he learned what he was doing and began to relearn things and became the man he was destined to be!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, eBook, Education, History, Issues, Law, News, Politics, Reading, Review, war, Writing

Victory at Any Cost: The Genius of Viet Nam’s Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap by Cecil B. Currey

Victory

Tells the full story of the man who fought three of the world’s great powers—and won. Cecil B. Currey makes clear one primary reason why America lost the Vietnam War: Vo Nguyen Giap. He has written the definitive biography of one of history’s greatest generals.

Unlike Generals throughout history, believing they must occupy the high ground, Giap grasped the hearts of the people. This was an extraordinary story of one of the most prolific Generals in the history of mankind. Starting with nothing he built up an army of citizens who focused on the people.

An excellent read and one of those books yous should place on the back-burner to read. I, personally, found it to be a true page turner.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, eBook, Education, History, Missions, Politics, Reading, Review, war, Writing

Florence Nightingale: A Life Inspired by Lynn M Hamilton

img_5478

Has there ever been someone who accomplished so much and at the same time thought less of herself? Before she had even turned forty, Florence Nightingale was the darling of the British public, the heroine of the Crimea. She could have sailed home to England and comfortably dined out on her fame for the remainder of her long days. Instead, she conducted a ruthless post-mortem on every moment of her wartime service and found herself entirely wanting. She did not try to hide her mistakes; instead, she sought to broadcast them so that everyone would understand what happens in unsanitary medical facilities. She could well have slid into self-pity and inertia, yet she spent the next several decades campaigning for reforms. One hundred and fifty years ago, the respect we now have for nurses and the intense training that nurses must undergo was nothing but a seed in Florence Nightingale’s imagination. If we believe that nurses are some of the most respectable and hardworking people in our community, we owe that belief to Florence Nightingale. But she never took the credit. As an old woman of seventy-seven, she deflected all her accomplishments onto God with the words, “How inefficient I was in the Crimea! Yet He has raised up Trained Nursing from it!”

***********

Quite a fascinating woman! On the same line as Mother Theresa. She left a life of luxury to do great works for God’s calling. Seeking to help those less fortunate and with the mind to help the less fortunate. An awesome passage in our history, one of the likes we don’t hear about in our history classes, in High School or in college course work. Truly sad that our history programs have gone to the way-side. We need to hear more of these historical figures in our course work so that we keep these great people in the limelight so these heroes remain alive in our hearts and minds. Thus, fostering a new age in our history through the present. As there are some that would be inspired about such things.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, christian, eBook, Education, Faith, History, Issues, Missions, Politics, Reading, Religious, Review, Writing

Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus: A Devout Muslim Encounters Christianity by Nabeel Qureshi

finding jesus

In Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus, now expanded with bonus content, Nabeel Qureshi describes his dramatic journey from Islam to Christianity, complete with friendships, investigations, and supernatural dreams along the way.

Providing an intimate window into a loving Muslim home, Qureshi shares how he developed a passion for Islam before discovering, almost against his will, evidence that Jesus rose from the dead and claimed to be God. Unable to deny the arguments but not wanting to deny his family, Qureshi struggled with an inner turmoil that will challenge Christians, Muslims, and all those who are interested in the world’s greatest religions.

Engaging and thought-provoking, Seeking Allah, Finding Jesus tells a powerful story of the clash between Islam and Christianity in one man’s heart—and of the peace he eventually found in Jesus.

I found this book most extraordinary in it’s presentation of a Christian meeting a Muslim who is open minded, and vice versa. As both were willing to speak to one another freely and openly to discuss their beliefs and why they believed what they believed. This is the crux of the apologetic argumentation. That which Christians MUST be willing to do…know, understand, and both discuss and explain why they believe what it is that they believe. It is in this way that man will win his fellow man for God through such open dialogue and discussion. And it is not the argument, itself, which causes one to change their beliefs. Rather it is the Spirit of God who touches our hearts and guides us toward the answers we need. You may win a few people this way, but the majority will be won through the Holy Spirit!

An EXCELLENT book which was well worth the time to read!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Apologetic, Biographies, Books, christian, eBook, Education, Evangelistic, Faith, Reading, Review, Writing

Jimmy Stewart: Bomber Pilotby Starr Smith, Walter Cronkite (Foreword by)

Overview
Of all the celebrities who served their country during World War II, Jimmy Stewart was unique. At the height of his fame, Jimmy Stewart enlisted in the army several months before the Pearl Harbor attacks woke Hollywood and the rest of the nation to the reality of war. “It’s a true story of personal knowledge,” writes Walter Cronkite in the foreword, “and is told with skill, respect, and admiration.” Author Starr Smith chronicles for the first time Stewart’s long journey to becoming a bomber pilot in combat, including:

· Stewart’s battles with the Air Corps high command
· His assignment to a Liberator squadron in England with the famed Mighty Eighth Air Force
· His twenty combat missions—including one to Berlin—in command of his own squadron in the 445th Bomb Group
· Later, Stewart’s promotion to group operations officer for the 453rd Bomb Group

Jimmy Stewart was a very interesting character, truly his story shows that Hollywood was once a different place with a much different class of people! A worthwhile read which will truly open your eyes about a man who went from thousands of dollars a month to $21/month. And he sought it! A rare breed of person.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, eBook, Education, History, Reading, Review, war

You Don’t Lose ‘Til You Quit Trying: Lessons on Adversity and Victory from a Vietnam Veteran and Medal of Honor Recipientby Sammy Lee Davis, Caroline Lambert, Gary Sinise (Foreword by)

The inspiring true life story of Vietnam veteran, Medal of Honor recipient, and veteran’s advocate Sammy Lee Davis.

On November 18, 1967, twenty-one-year-old Private First Class Davis’s artillery unit was hit by a massive enemy offensive. Soon he would have a perforated kidney, crushed ribs, a broken vertebra, ripped flesh from beehive darts, a bullet in his thigh, and burns all over his body. Ignoring his injuries, he manned a two-ton howitzer by himself, crossed a canal under heavy fire to rescue three wounded American soldiers, and kept fighting until the enemy retreated. His heroism that day earned him a Medal of Honor.

You Don’t Lose ’Til You Quit Trying chronicles how his childhood in the American heartland prepared him for the worst night of his life—and how that night set off a lifelong battle against debilitating injuries, the effects of Agent Orange, and an America that was turning on its veterans.

But he also battled for his fellow veterans, speaking on their behalf for forty years to help heal the wounds and memorialize the brotherhood that war could forge. Here, readers will learn of Sammy Davis’s extraordinary life—the courage, the pain, and the triumph.

An interesting story of a man who walked the path of the extraordinary. Many tips can be gleaned from this warrior. Vietnam changed a great any men, some for the better, others for the worse. He was one of the ones who overcame and conquered!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, Education, Faith, Reading, Review, war

Five Years to Freedom: The True Story of a Vietnam POW by James N. Rowe

In 1963, Nick Rowe is with a group of Vietnamese soldiers on a routine mission when they encounter Vietcong soldiers. In the fight, Rowe and a fellow soldier are captured. Rowe realizes the seriousness of his situation but is unable to do anything about it immediately. As time passes, Rowe is often weakened and is constantly pushed to declare that the Vietcong are justified in all aspects of the war and that his own countrymen are wrong. Failure to do so continually prompts varying degrees of punishment. For five years his captors work to instill a series of propaganda statements into Rowe’s mind and Rowe continues to disbelieve his captors.
Rowe is a military man, having decided to attend West Point because his older brother was killed prior to his own graduation. Rowe is deployed to Vietnam without really knowing all the politics involved. Rowe comes to like many of the Vietnamese people and sometimes helps with distribution of medicine and other activities. After his capture, he becomes bombarded with information that the Vietnamese people as a whole support the Vietcong and that the American prisoners are in danger of being attacked by the general populace. After several years as a prisoner, he is taken on a tour of the region – ostensibly to see the true state of the people. He encounters some people who remember him from his days as a soldier so many years earlier. One risks punishment to touch Rowe on the shoulder and an elderly woman speaks up and questions the reason Rowe appears to be undernourished. Rowe leaves that situation and finds his resolve to remain strong against the pressure to admit to “crimes” against the Vietcong.

Rowe encounters several other prisoners during his time as a POW. Some of those survive and are released. Others die while Rowe watches, helpless to do anything to prevent it. He is held alone during his final months as a prisoner and he finds the situation initially frightening but then finds a new freedom in that he is no longer responsible for anyone else. When Rowe and his captors are fleeing American bombers, he arranges the opportunity to be alone with a single captor then hits the man over the hand to get away so that he can flag down a passing helicopter. His mother’s words, when she knows that he is safe, are, “What took you so long?”

Rowe is a strong person and remains so in the face of near-starvation and psychological torment. One of the most serious moments of torment for him comes when American bombers are striking the camp and he comes to fear that he’ll die at the hands of his own people.

This was a true eye opening and thought provoking book where you had to sense, see and feel what was happening around you. A mindfully written book that challenged you to feel for the POWs, what they were going through, how they were treated, etc. Was a person to die by sickness?..at the hands of the NVA?..or at the hands of his own people? A riveting book filled with questions, in some cases still not answered. War is hell, war sucks, and if more people understood the ramifications of war…there would be a movement by all people to stop war.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, Education, Faith, History, Issues, News, Politics, Reading, war, Writing

HERSHEYMilton S. Hershey’s Extraordinary Life of Wealth, Empire, and Utopian Dreamsby Michael D’Antonio

The name Hershey evokes many things: chocolate bars, the company town in Pennsylvania, one of America’s most recognizable brands. But who was the man behind the name? In this compelling biography, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael D’Antonio gives us the real-life rags-to-riches story of Milton S. Hershey, a largely uneducated businessman whose idealistic sense of purpose created an immense financial empire, a town, and a legacy that lasts to this day.

A rathe good read concerning a man with a dream, a desire, a fire burning drive, and the faith to shoot for the stars. An interesting life, to say the least!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, History, Reading, Writing

Never Met a Man I Didn’t Like: The Life and Writings of Will Rogers by Will Rogers & Joseph H. Carter

never-met-a-man

Will Rogers was America. Part Cherokee Indian and former cowboy, he captivated audiences around the world with sparkling gems of wisdom cloaked in gentle and uproarious country wit and astonishing rope tricks. His colorful life recently inspired a commercially successful and critically acclaimed Broadway musical — winner of 6 Tony Awards. His words are as entertaining, inspiring and revelant today as they ever were.

A simple, plain-spoken man, he was the voice of a nation during the ’20s and ’30s. Movie star, vaudeville headliner, radio commentator, his views and observations were syndicated daily and weekly in over 600 newspapers across the country.

Here is the essential Will Rogers — the story of his remarkable career, from Oklahoma “cowpuncher” to international star . . . and the warm, knowing and hilarious philosophies of the man embodied the heart and soul of the nation.

While I disagree with his politics (overall), it is without doubt difficult, at best, to not laugh at his commentary and his genuine witticism.  He was a generous man with a zeal for living life and helping his fellow man who was down and out.  He made fortunes and he lost them, and he made them back again. Never afraid of a challenge, he always sought to go head on. He was but 56 when he died, but lived a life fuller than most who lived until twice that.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, Education, History, Issues, News, Politics, Quotes, Reading, Review, war, Writing