Category Archives: Reading

Answers to Life’s Problems by Billy Graham

Answers to Lifes Problems

Imagine being able to sit down with Billy Graham and ask him for advice. In response to thousands of letters, Billy Graham offers guidance and answers to the most-often asked questions about every aspect of life, including relationships, ethics, psychological problems and spirituality.

These are collections of what people had written in to newspapers for him to answer…a spiritually guided “Dear Abby” in male form, if you will. I liken his candor and wisdom to that of the books of Psalms, Proverbs, Song of Solomon, and Ecclesiastes. Wisdom applicable to all people at different points in time of their lives. We can each glean much from Dr. Graham and as we grow more “youth challenged” in our lives, we tend to become wiser in some of our decisions. Especially those decisions with respect to our spiritual desires and need for guidance.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Apologetic, Books, christian, eBook, Education, Evangelistic, Faith, Issues, Ministry, Reading, Religious, Writing

An Inconvenient Book: Real Solutions to the World’s Biggest Problems by Glenn Beck

inconvenient book

Now available in trade paperback, the #1 bestselling New York Times author Glenn Beck tackles some of our country’s biggest problems in this funny, outrageous, and entertaining book.

Glenn Beck believes that the reason why some of our biggest problems never seem to get fixed is simple: the solutions just aren’t very convenient. And as the host of a nationally syndicated radio show and a prime-time television show on CNN Headline News, Glenn Beck doesn’t care much about convenience; he cares about common sense.

Take the issue of poverty, for example. Over the last forty years, America’s poorest cities all had one simple thing in common, but politicians will never reveal what that is (or explain how easy it would be to change). Global warming is another issue that’s rife with lies and distortion. How many times have we heard that carbon dioxide is responsible for huge natural disasters that have killed millions of people? The truth is, it’s actually the other way around: as CO2 has increased, deaths from extreme weather have decreased. But that would never be shown in an Al Gore slide show.

Combining honesty with a biting sense of humor, An Inconvenient Book contains hundreds of these “why have I never heard that before?” types of facts that will leave readers wondering how political correctness, special interests, and outright stupidity have gotten us so far away from the common sense solutions this country was built on.

Though, this book came out around 2009 some, not all, material is a little dated; however, the solutions and ideas behind what Glenn Beck is discussing is still valid and in tact. An interesting read, funny at times, some freelance sarcasm splashed in there, with a big slap in the face of some much needed reality! God help us, as we cannot rely on the politicians to solve our problems…when will the people of America wake up to such a dose of factual reality? At this point…not certain they ever will! But we all have hopes and aspirations in our lives, that just happens to be one of mine! Open the book covers at your own risk and read it with an open mind.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Books, eBook, Education, History, Issues, News, Politics, Reading, Review

You Don’t Need a Title To Be a Leader: How Anyone, Anywhere, Can Make a Positive Difference by Mark Sanborn


In his inspiring new book, You Don’t Need a Title to Be a Leader, Mark Sanborn, the author of the national bestseller The Fred Factor, shows how each of us can be a leader in our daily lives and make a positive difference, whatever our title or position.  Through the stories of a number of unsung heroes, Sanborn reveals the keys each one of us can use to improve our organizations and enhance our careers.  Genuine leadership – leadership with a “little l”, as he puts it, is not conferred by a title, or limited to the executive suite. Rather, it is shown through our everyday actions and the way we influence the lives of those around us. Among the qualities that genuine leaders share:
• Acting with purpose rather than getting bogged down by mindless activity

• Caring about and listening to others

• Looking for ways to encourage the contributions and development of others rather than focusing solely on personal achievements

• Creating a legacy of accomplishment and contribution in everything they do
As readers across the country discovered in The Fred Factor, Mark Sanborn has an unparalleled ability to explain fundamental business and leadership truths through simple stories and anecdotes. You Don’t Need a Title to Be a Leader offers an inspiring message to anyone who wants to take control of their life and make a positive difference.

A valuable resource in order to reconcile the fact that one is not automatically a leader because of title, as men do not follow titles. But they do follow because of loyalty and knowing how much you care for them!

Worth the time to read as you can pick up a number of tips in order to better yourself in the eyes of your subordinates and peers!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Books, eBook, Education, Issues, Reading, Writing

Jimmy Stewart: Bomber Pilotby Starr Smith, Walter Cronkite (Foreword by)

Overview
Of all the celebrities who served their country during World War II, Jimmy Stewart was unique. At the height of his fame, Jimmy Stewart enlisted in the army several months before the Pearl Harbor attacks woke Hollywood and the rest of the nation to the reality of war. “It’s a true story of personal knowledge,” writes Walter Cronkite in the foreword, “and is told with skill, respect, and admiration.” Author Starr Smith chronicles for the first time Stewart’s long journey to becoming a bomber pilot in combat, including:

· Stewart’s battles with the Air Corps high command
· His assignment to a Liberator squadron in England with the famed Mighty Eighth Air Force
· His twenty combat missions—including one to Berlin—in command of his own squadron in the 445th Bomb Group
· Later, Stewart’s promotion to group operations officer for the 453rd Bomb Group

Jimmy Stewart was a very interesting character, truly his story shows that Hollywood was once a different place with a much different class of people! A worthwhile read which will truly open your eyes about a man who went from thousands of dollars a month to $21/month. And he sought it! A rare breed of person.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, eBook, Education, History, Reading, Review, war

You Don’t Lose ‘Til You Quit Trying: Lessons on Adversity and Victory from a Vietnam Veteran and Medal of Honor Recipientby Sammy Lee Davis, Caroline Lambert, Gary Sinise (Foreword by)

The inspiring true life story of Vietnam veteran, Medal of Honor recipient, and veteran’s advocate Sammy Lee Davis.

On November 18, 1967, twenty-one-year-old Private First Class Davis’s artillery unit was hit by a massive enemy offensive. Soon he would have a perforated kidney, crushed ribs, a broken vertebra, ripped flesh from beehive darts, a bullet in his thigh, and burns all over his body. Ignoring his injuries, he manned a two-ton howitzer by himself, crossed a canal under heavy fire to rescue three wounded American soldiers, and kept fighting until the enemy retreated. His heroism that day earned him a Medal of Honor.

You Don’t Lose ’Til You Quit Trying chronicles how his childhood in the American heartland prepared him for the worst night of his life—and how that night set off a lifelong battle against debilitating injuries, the effects of Agent Orange, and an America that was turning on its veterans.

But he also battled for his fellow veterans, speaking on their behalf for forty years to help heal the wounds and memorialize the brotherhood that war could forge. Here, readers will learn of Sammy Davis’s extraordinary life—the courage, the pain, and the triumph.

An interesting story of a man who walked the path of the extraordinary. Many tips can be gleaned from this warrior. Vietnam changed a great any men, some for the better, others for the worse. He was one of the ones who overcame and conquered!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, Education, Faith, Reading, Review, war

Spirit Warriors: Strategies for the Battles Christian Men and Women Face Every Day by Stu Weber

836968

Pastor and former Green Beret captain Stu Weber reveals the crucial spiritual battles that all Christians face constantly, whether or not they are aware of them. “Somehow we have come to mistakenly associate spiritual warfare with charismatic personalities strutting across brightly lit platforms … whuppin’ up on evil spirits,” says Weber. “But spiritual warfare is so much more than a show.” With warm and winning counsel, the bestselling author/speaker warns of the very real perils readers face, giving them what they need to survive and thrive.

Paying attention to what is happening around you, daily, and to what the Word of God (Bible) is saying are two of the greatest elements to this present battle of Spiritual warfare. You MUST choose God’s word over the words of man. You MUST choose the full armor of God rather than the armor of this world…you will be severely unprepared.

A MUST read book with a MUST listen to message!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Apologetic, Books, christian, eBook, Education, Evangelistic, Faith, Issues, Ministry, Missions, Reading, Religious, war

pegasus

In the early morning hours of June 6, 1944, a small detachment of British airborne troops stormed the German defense forces and paved the way for the Allied invasion of Europe. Pegasus Bridge was the first engagement of D-Day, the turning point of World War II.

This gripping account of it by acclaimed author Stephen Ambrose brings to life a daring mission so crucial that, had it been unsuccessful, the entire Normandy invasion might have failed. Ambrose traces each step of the preparations over many months to the minute-by-minute excitement of the hand-to-hand confrontations on the bridge. This is a story of heroism and cowardice, kindness and brutality—the stuff of all great adventures.

Just one aspect of the D-Day invasion which was a turning point of the war, in some aspects. Well written and a short read. Something for a lazy day at home in order to learn a little bit more on the topic of World War II. Stephen Ambrose has numerous books, which he has written on the subject of topic : WWII. Check out some of his other books as well if you like this one…you will love BAND OF BROTHERS. Of course, there are other topics he has written on.

Godspeed and Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Books, Education, History, Issues, Reading, Review, war, Writing

Killerbowl by Gary K. Wolf

Released by Doubleday on September 26, 1975
It’s thirty years in the future. The ultraviolent sport of Professional Street Football, a phenomenally popular 24-four-hour-long athletic event, combines pro football with mixed martial arts, armed combat, and street fighting. On New Years day, quarterback T.K. Mann plays the most dangerous game of his life, the game known as……Killerbowl!

While the novel is not my pick of choice, as I am more of a learner as opposed to imaginative reader. This was a staunch reminder of when I read ROLLERBALL, later to become a movie with James Caan. But a friend thought I would like this. Unfortunately not a big fan, but it was okay. It had taken me out of my norm and my comfort zone, as a matter of speaking. This is more for someone who truly appreciates this genre of book.

Godspeed & Good Read!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Books, Film, Reading, Review, war, Writing

Five Years to Freedom: The True Story of a Vietnam POW by James N. Rowe

In 1963, Nick Rowe is with a group of Vietnamese soldiers on a routine mission when they encounter Vietcong soldiers. In the fight, Rowe and a fellow soldier are captured. Rowe realizes the seriousness of his situation but is unable to do anything about it immediately. As time passes, Rowe is often weakened and is constantly pushed to declare that the Vietcong are justified in all aspects of the war and that his own countrymen are wrong. Failure to do so continually prompts varying degrees of punishment. For five years his captors work to instill a series of propaganda statements into Rowe’s mind and Rowe continues to disbelieve his captors.
Rowe is a military man, having decided to attend West Point because his older brother was killed prior to his own graduation. Rowe is deployed to Vietnam without really knowing all the politics involved. Rowe comes to like many of the Vietnamese people and sometimes helps with distribution of medicine and other activities. After his capture, he becomes bombarded with information that the Vietnamese people as a whole support the Vietcong and that the American prisoners are in danger of being attacked by the general populace. After several years as a prisoner, he is taken on a tour of the region – ostensibly to see the true state of the people. He encounters some people who remember him from his days as a soldier so many years earlier. One risks punishment to touch Rowe on the shoulder and an elderly woman speaks up and questions the reason Rowe appears to be undernourished. Rowe leaves that situation and finds his resolve to remain strong against the pressure to admit to “crimes” against the Vietcong.

Rowe encounters several other prisoners during his time as a POW. Some of those survive and are released. Others die while Rowe watches, helpless to do anything to prevent it. He is held alone during his final months as a prisoner and he finds the situation initially frightening but then finds a new freedom in that he is no longer responsible for anyone else. When Rowe and his captors are fleeing American bombers, he arranges the opportunity to be alone with a single captor then hits the man over the hand to get away so that he can flag down a passing helicopter. His mother’s words, when she knows that he is safe, are, “What took you so long?”

Rowe is a strong person and remains so in the face of near-starvation and psychological torment. One of the most serious moments of torment for him comes when American bombers are striking the camp and he comes to fear that he’ll die at the hands of his own people.

This was a true eye opening and thought provoking book where you had to sense, see and feel what was happening around you. A mindfully written book that challenged you to feel for the POWs, what they were going through, how they were treated, etc. Was a person to die by sickness?..at the hands of the NVA?..or at the hands of his own people? A riveting book filled with questions, in some cases still not answered. War is hell, war sucks, and if more people understood the ramifications of war…there would be a movement by all people to stop war.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, Education, Faith, History, Issues, News, Politics, Reading, war, Writing

HERSHEYMilton S. Hershey’s Extraordinary Life of Wealth, Empire, and Utopian Dreamsby Michael D’Antonio

The name Hershey evokes many things: chocolate bars, the company town in Pennsylvania, one of America’s most recognizable brands. But who was the man behind the name? In this compelling biography, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael D’Antonio gives us the real-life rags-to-riches story of Milton S. Hershey, a largely uneducated businessman whose idealistic sense of purpose created an immense financial empire, a town, and a legacy that lasts to this day.

A rathe good read concerning a man with a dream, a desire, a fire burning drive, and the faith to shoot for the stars. An interesting life, to say the least!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

Leave a comment

Filed under Biographies, Books, History, Reading, Writing