Category Archives: Writing

Answers to Life’s Problems by Billy Graham

Answers to Lifes Problems

Imagine being able to sit down with Billy Graham and ask him for advice. In response to thousands of letters, Billy Graham offers guidance and answers to the most-often asked questions about every aspect of life, including relationships, ethics, psychological problems and spirituality.

These are collections of what people had written in to newspapers for him to answer…a spiritually guided “Dear Abby” in male form, if you will. I liken his candor and wisdom to that of the books of Psalms, Proverbs, Song of Solomon, and Ecclesiastes. Wisdom applicable to all people at different points in time of their lives. We can each glean much from Dr. Graham and as we grow more “youth challenged” in our lives, we tend to become wiser in some of our decisions. Especially those decisions with respect to our spiritual desires and need for guidance.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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You Don’t Need a Title To Be a Leader: How Anyone, Anywhere, Can Make a Positive Difference by Mark Sanborn


In his inspiring new book, You Don’t Need a Title to Be a Leader, Mark Sanborn, the author of the national bestseller The Fred Factor, shows how each of us can be a leader in our daily lives and make a positive difference, whatever our title or position.  Through the stories of a number of unsung heroes, Sanborn reveals the keys each one of us can use to improve our organizations and enhance our careers.  Genuine leadership – leadership with a “little l”, as he puts it, is not conferred by a title, or limited to the executive suite. Rather, it is shown through our everyday actions and the way we influence the lives of those around us. Among the qualities that genuine leaders share:
• Acting with purpose rather than getting bogged down by mindless activity

• Caring about and listening to others

• Looking for ways to encourage the contributions and development of others rather than focusing solely on personal achievements

• Creating a legacy of accomplishment and contribution in everything they do
As readers across the country discovered in The Fred Factor, Mark Sanborn has an unparalleled ability to explain fundamental business and leadership truths through simple stories and anecdotes. You Don’t Need a Title to Be a Leader offers an inspiring message to anyone who wants to take control of their life and make a positive difference.

A valuable resource in order to reconcile the fact that one is not automatically a leader because of title, as men do not follow titles. But they do follow because of loyalty and knowing how much you care for them!

Worth the time to read as you can pick up a number of tips in order to better yourself in the eyes of your subordinates and peers!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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pegasus

In the early morning hours of June 6, 1944, a small detachment of British airborne troops stormed the German defense forces and paved the way for the Allied invasion of Europe. Pegasus Bridge was the first engagement of D-Day, the turning point of World War II.

This gripping account of it by acclaimed author Stephen Ambrose brings to life a daring mission so crucial that, had it been unsuccessful, the entire Normandy invasion might have failed. Ambrose traces each step of the preparations over many months to the minute-by-minute excitement of the hand-to-hand confrontations on the bridge. This is a story of heroism and cowardice, kindness and brutality—the stuff of all great adventures.

Just one aspect of the D-Day invasion which was a turning point of the war, in some aspects. Well written and a short read. Something for a lazy day at home in order to learn a little bit more on the topic of World War II. Stephen Ambrose has numerous books, which he has written on the subject of topic : WWII. Check out some of his other books as well if you like this one…you will love BAND OF BROTHERS. Of course, there are other topics he has written on.

Godspeed and Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Killerbowl by Gary K. Wolf

Released by Doubleday on September 26, 1975
It’s thirty years in the future. The ultraviolent sport of Professional Street Football, a phenomenally popular 24-four-hour-long athletic event, combines pro football with mixed martial arts, armed combat, and street fighting. On New Years day, quarterback T.K. Mann plays the most dangerous game of his life, the game known as……Killerbowl!

While the novel is not my pick of choice, as I am more of a learner as opposed to imaginative reader. This was a staunch reminder of when I read ROLLERBALL, later to become a movie with James Caan. But a friend thought I would like this. Unfortunately not a big fan, but it was okay. It had taken me out of my norm and my comfort zone, as a matter of speaking. This is more for someone who truly appreciates this genre of book.

Godspeed & Good Read!

Doc Murf

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Five Years to Freedom: The True Story of a Vietnam POW by James N. Rowe

In 1963, Nick Rowe is with a group of Vietnamese soldiers on a routine mission when they encounter Vietcong soldiers. In the fight, Rowe and a fellow soldier are captured. Rowe realizes the seriousness of his situation but is unable to do anything about it immediately. As time passes, Rowe is often weakened and is constantly pushed to declare that the Vietcong are justified in all aspects of the war and that his own countrymen are wrong. Failure to do so continually prompts varying degrees of punishment. For five years his captors work to instill a series of propaganda statements into Rowe’s mind and Rowe continues to disbelieve his captors.
Rowe is a military man, having decided to attend West Point because his older brother was killed prior to his own graduation. Rowe is deployed to Vietnam without really knowing all the politics involved. Rowe comes to like many of the Vietnamese people and sometimes helps with distribution of medicine and other activities. After his capture, he becomes bombarded with information that the Vietnamese people as a whole support the Vietcong and that the American prisoners are in danger of being attacked by the general populace. After several years as a prisoner, he is taken on a tour of the region – ostensibly to see the true state of the people. He encounters some people who remember him from his days as a soldier so many years earlier. One risks punishment to touch Rowe on the shoulder and an elderly woman speaks up and questions the reason Rowe appears to be undernourished. Rowe leaves that situation and finds his resolve to remain strong against the pressure to admit to “crimes” against the Vietcong.

Rowe encounters several other prisoners during his time as a POW. Some of those survive and are released. Others die while Rowe watches, helpless to do anything to prevent it. He is held alone during his final months as a prisoner and he finds the situation initially frightening but then finds a new freedom in that he is no longer responsible for anyone else. When Rowe and his captors are fleeing American bombers, he arranges the opportunity to be alone with a single captor then hits the man over the hand to get away so that he can flag down a passing helicopter. His mother’s words, when she knows that he is safe, are, “What took you so long?”

Rowe is a strong person and remains so in the face of near-starvation and psychological torment. One of the most serious moments of torment for him comes when American bombers are striking the camp and he comes to fear that he’ll die at the hands of his own people.

This was a true eye opening and thought provoking book where you had to sense, see and feel what was happening around you. A mindfully written book that challenged you to feel for the POWs, what they were going through, how they were treated, etc. Was a person to die by sickness?..at the hands of the NVA?..or at the hands of his own people? A riveting book filled with questions, in some cases still not answered. War is hell, war sucks, and if more people understood the ramifications of war…there would be a movement by all people to stop war.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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HERSHEYMilton S. Hershey’s Extraordinary Life of Wealth, Empire, and Utopian Dreamsby Michael D’Antonio

The name Hershey evokes many things: chocolate bars, the company town in Pennsylvania, one of America’s most recognizable brands. But who was the man behind the name? In this compelling biography, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael D’Antonio gives us the real-life rags-to-riches story of Milton S. Hershey, a largely uneducated businessman whose idealistic sense of purpose created an immense financial empire, a town, and a legacy that lasts to this day.

A rathe good read concerning a man with a dream, a desire, a fire burning drive, and the faith to shoot for the stars. An interesting life, to say the least!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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30 Days to Understanding the Bible in 15 Minutes a Day: Expanded Edition Paperback by Max Anders

30-days-bible

30 Days to Understanding the Bible, the innovative teach-yourself guide that’s helped so many readers get more out of the Bible, just got even better! Now Max Anders’ remarkable resource for Bible learning is available in a new, expanded edition, with all the features that made the original so popular – plus much more.

Proven effective by over 200,000 readers, 30 Days to Understanding the Bible helps you learn to position key Bible characters, places, and events in chronological order so that you can “think your way through” the entire Word of God. Through interesting, memory-enhancing exercises, 30 Days to Understanding the Bible acquaints readers with the core teachings of Scripture in just 15 minutes a day!

Bible study leaders and Sunday school teachers will appreciate the new Teaching Plan with activities and directions for a 12-week group study, complete with overhead transparency masters for class or home group use.

This is an excellent resource for bible studying and understanding. Worthy of opening time-and-again. It will help with increased understanding and comprehension of the content within the two covers of your Holy Bible. It, could be, a great study, in itself, for the bible.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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How to Debate Leftists and Destroy Them: 11 Rules for Winning the Argument Kindle Edition by Ben Shapiro

debate

The problem, as Ben Shapiro puts it in this must-read, is that “because conservatives don’t think about how to win that they constantly lose” in confrontations with leftists. The solution is to stop taking the bullying and learning to argue for victory.
Among Shapiro’s rules for beating the left in confrontations are:
Be willing to take a punch. (conservatives tend to shy away from confrontations because the left is rhetorically violent; but it is important “to walk toward the fire.” )
Hit hard, hit first. (leftists stage muggings; instead of fighting by Marquis of Queensberry rules, conservatives need to accept the strategy Mike Tyson: “Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.”)
Immediately frame the debate. (“When you’re discussing global warming , for example, the proper question is not whether man is causing global warming but whether man can fix global warming—a question to which the universally acknowledged answer is no unless we are willing to revert to the pre industrial age.”)
There are eight more rules that will allow a conservative to debate a leftist and destroy him. How to Debate Leftists and Destroy Them is not just a “how to” book. It is a survival manual.

By far one of the most succinct and to the point discussions on debating someone from the opposite side of the isle (i.e., a leftest minded liberal.) Just as discussed in his book that the left has one play to knock you down and get you off your game. But a debate with a liberal minded individual is, in fact, a war. And you must be willing to strike first and strike hard! And keep striking until they are finished. This is one of the greatest failing of the conservative movement because they believe that they can overcome all these hits with something substantive…but people only see and understand when you have been knocked out…we all have this failing because we were brought up, overall with a sense of fair play. But in a war, all stops must be pulled and you must be willing to win the war, not just the argument.

Without a doubt, a very good read and worthwhile information! It is a short book and would & could very easily be put to memory and to the test!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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52 Small Changes for the Mind By Brett Blumenthal

Small changes work. In this practical book, wellness expert Brett Blumenthal reveals how to hone in on the mind as the foundation of overall health and well-being. She presents one small, achievable change every week—from developing music appreciation to eating brain-boosting foods, practicing mono-tasking, incorporating play, and more. The accumulation of these lifestyle changes ultimately leads to improved memory, less stress, increased productivity, and sustained happiness. Backed by research from leading experts and full of helpful charts and worksheets, 52 Small Changes for the Mind provides a road map to a better life—and proves that the journey can be as rewarding as the destination.

It is truly funny how the most simplistic changes can be the most profound! Well worth the time to review against your life, and make those changes you have put off for so long.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Red Star Rogue by Kenneth Sewell


One of the great secrets of the Cold War, hidden for decades, is revealed at last.

Early in 1968 a nuclear-armed Soviet submarine sank in the waters off Hawaii, hundreds of miles closer to American shores than it should have been. Compelling evidence, assembled here for the first time, strongly suggests that the sub, K-129, sank while attempting to fire a nuclear missile, most likely at the naval base at Pearl Harbor.

We now know that the Soviets had lost track of the sub; it had become a rogue. While the Soviets searched in vain for the boat, U.S. intelligence was able to pinpoint the site of the disaster. The new Nixon administration launched a clandestine, half-billion-dollar project to recover the sunken K-129. Contrary to years of deliberately misleading reports, the recovery operation was a great success. With the recovery of the sub, it became clear that the rogue was attempting to mimic a Chinese submarine, almost certainly with the intention of provoking a war between the U.S. and China. This was a carefully planned operation that, had it succeeded, would have had devastating consequences. During the successful recovery effort, the U.S. forged new relationships with the USSR and China. Could the information gleaned from the sunken sub have been a decisive factor shaping the new policies of détente between the Americans and the Soviets, and opening China to the West? And who in the USSR could have planned such a bold and potentially catastrophic operation?

Red Star Rogue reads like something straight out of a Tom Clancy novel, but it is all true. Today our greatest fear is that terrorists may someday acquire a nuclear weapon and use it against us.In fact, they have already tried.

A very riveting, nail biting, drama of our time. The truth is far more scarier than fiction, they say…tis true! Well worth the time to read this book!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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