Tag Archives: issues

The Case for the Real Jesus: A Journalist Investigates Current Attacks on the Identity of Christ by Lee Strobel

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What IS the truth about Jesus?

Today, the traditional picture of Jesus is under an intellectual onslaught from critical scholars, popular historians, TV documentaries, Hollywood movies, bestselling authors, Internet bloggers, and atheist think tanks. They’re capturing the public’s imagination with a radical new portrait of Jesus that bears scant resemblance to the picture historically embraced by the church.
How persuasive is this new image of Jesus? Is it based on well-supported facts and arguments? Or does it fade away when exposed to the hot light of
scrutiny?
In this dramatic investigation, award-winning writer and former legal editor
Lee Strobel explores such controversial questions as:

  • Did Christianity suppress “alternative gospels” that portray Jesus more
    accurately than the New Testament?
  • Did the church distort the truth about Jesus by tampering with early
    biblical texts?
  • Have fresh insights and explanations finally disproved the resurrection?
  • Were the essential beliefs about Jesus stolen from earlier mythology?
  • Have new objections disqualified Jesus from being the Messiah?

Evaluate the evidence for yourself as leading experts grapple with the latest objections from today’s foremost critics. Then reach your own verdict in The Case for the Real Jesus.

THIS was an AWESOME book for anyone at any level in their walk in Christianity! Great resource for the evangelist or the apologist. A great resource for those discipling others in their walk with Christ. A strong foundation of philosophically, archaeologically, and historically needed information in order to make that plunging step with your life to completely turn it over to the Lord! Well worth the read and would be a worthwhile tool to use as a study over the belief in Jesus as the Christ!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Filed under Apologetic, Books, christian, eBook, Education, Evangelistic, Faith, History, Reading, Religious, Review

Never Met a Man I Didn’t Like: The Life and Writings of Will Rogers by Will Rogers & Joseph H. Carter

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Will Rogers was America. Part Cherokee Indian and former cowboy, he captivated audiences around the world with sparkling gems of wisdom cloaked in gentle and uproarious country wit and astonishing rope tricks. His colorful life recently inspired a commercially successful and critically acclaimed Broadway musical — winner of 6 Tony Awards. His words are as entertaining, inspiring and revelant today as they ever were.

A simple, plain-spoken man, he was the voice of a nation during the ’20s and ’30s. Movie star, vaudeville headliner, radio commentator, his views and observations were syndicated daily and weekly in over 600 newspapers across the country.

Here is the essential Will Rogers — the story of his remarkable career, from Oklahoma “cowpuncher” to international star . . . and the warm, knowing and hilarious philosophies of the man embodied the heart and soul of the nation.

While I disagree with his politics (overall), it is without doubt difficult, at best, to not laugh at his commentary and his genuine witticism.  He was a generous man with a zeal for living life and helping his fellow man who was down and out.  He made fortunes and he lost them, and he made them back again. Never afraid of a challenge, he always sought to go head on. He was but 56 when he died, but lived a life fuller than most who lived until twice that.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Filed under Biographies, Books, Education, History, Issues, News, Politics, Quotes, Reading, Review, war, Writing

James Brother of Jesus

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james-brother-of-jesus5-150x1951In late December 2004, four Israelis and one Palestinian Arab were indicted in Jerusalem on charges of running a massive forgery ring over several decades. The Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) and the Israeli police claimed the ring had created a host of Biblically-related ancient artifacts with forged inscriptions involving millions of dollars, some of which are exhibited in the prestigious Israel Museum. The trial opened in September 2005 and continued for five years through 116 sessions, 133 witnesses, 200 exhibits, and close to 12,000 pages of testimony from witnesses.

In October 2010, closing arguments finally wrapped up in “the forgery trial of the century,” to determine whether or not the James Ossuary, the Yehoash tablet and other ancient artifacts were forged by two defendants. Trial judge Aharon Farkash pored through the evidence over the past 15 months, and on Wednesday, March 14, 2012, finally delivered his verdict.

In his verdict, the judge acquitted the case’s two remaining defendants, Tel Aviv collector Oded Golan and antiquities dealer and scholar Robert Deutsch, on all major counts of creating and selling forged antiquities, most notably the now-famous first-century C.E. bone box (or ossuary) inscribed “James, son of Joseph, brother of Jesus,” a small inscribed ivory pomegranate allegedly used in Solomon’s Temple, and the Yehoash tablet, which, if authentic, would be the first royal inscription of an Israelite king ever found.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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THE NATURAL LAW THEORY of THOMAS AQUINAS by Thomas D. D’Andrea

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Thomas D. D’Andrea, “The Natural Law Theory of Thomas Aquinas,” Natural Law, Natural Rights, and American Constitutionalism — a project of the Witherspoon Institute.

Thomas D. D’Andrea considers Aquinas’ theory of natural law at the Witherspoon Institute’s Natural Law, Natural Rights, and American Constitutionalism site.

Excerpt:

Thomas Aquinas is generally regarded as the West’s pre-eminent theorist of the natural law, critically inheriting the main traditions of natural law or quasi–natural law thinking in the ancient world (including the Platonic, and particularly Aristotelian and Stoic traditions) and bringing elements from these traditions into systematic relation in the framework of a metaphysics of creation and divine providence. His theory sets the terms of debate for subsequent natural law theorizing.

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OUTRAGE by Dick Morris & Eileen McGann

  

Half of all illegal immigrants came into this country legally—and we have no way of knowing they’re still here!

Congressmen are putting their wives on their campaign payrolls—so that campaign contributions are really personal bribes!

The ACLU won’t allow its own directors free speech.

Liberals want to strip us of the tools to stop terrorism.

The UN is a cover for massive corruption—and eighty countries, who pay 12 percent of the budget, are blocking reform.

Drug companies pay off doctors to write scripts—whether we need them or not.

Teachers unions block the firing of bad teachers—and battle against higher education standards!

Katrina victims are being stiffed by their insurance companies!

Special interests cost our consumers $45 billion—through trade quotas that save only a handful of jobs!

Never heard of these abuses? You won’t in the mainstream media. That’s why Dick Morris and Eileen McGann wrote Outrage. Their proposals:

  • Ban immigration from terrorist countries
  • Ban Congress putting spouses on their payroll
  • Ban lobbyists who are related to senators or congressmen
  • Ban nicotine additives to cigarettes
  • Ban trade quotas that drive up prices and save few jobs
  • Ban drug company bribes to doctors
  • Ban teachers unions’ work rules that stop education reform
  • Ban insurance companies from backing out on Katrina coverage

In Outrage, you’ll get the facts—and learn what we can do about them. You won’t read about these outrages anyplace else; too many people are working hard to cover them up. Get them here instead—and learn how to fight the special interests of the left and right.

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The Sunset Limited (Movie)

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“The Sunset Limited” opens in Black’s apartment with the two men sitting at a small dinner table in the kitchen. Here, Black digs into White’s brain to find out why he wanted to take that dive that would end his life. He also asks him questions about his beliefs and values. White doesn’t seem to have any personal beliefs or values. He doesn’t really have any friends other than a guy he grabs lunch with at his work every now and then.

Black converted to Christianity after his time in jail. He asks White – since he’s a college professor – how many books he has read. White gives an estimable answer of 4,000 over the course of his lifetime. His favorite book is “War and Peace,” but Black asks why he hasn’t read the “best book.” Black is referring to “The Bible.”

The movie pans out into Black’s deep, religious beliefs and goes into why he served time in prison and what happened in prison. While White sits and listens to his stories, he must think about what all this means. He tries to get up and leave several times, but he is drawn back into Black’s discussion. White keeps telling Black the only thing out there for him and the only thing he believes in is the Sunset Limited. It will take him to the only thing he believes he has left to do, which is to die. There seems to be nothing of value for him and nothing else he feels he can do. Black thinks there is more and tries to pursue White to think about life and God.

McCarthy took his own two-person play and wrote the screenplay to fit cinematic standards. How does a story that contains only two characters and one setting keep people interested? It’s all in the dialogue and the acting. McCarthy is the best choice for writing a screenplay like this; Jones and Jackson are the best choices for these two roles.

Their dialogue is not only theological and philosophical, but it’s also humorous. McCarthy is able to shed some comedic value into a deep discussion to keep the viewer interested.

I’ve seen parts of this movie before, which peaked my interest and I finally saw the whole movie. It is a very interesting set-up between an atheistic professor who desires to commit suicide and a felon murderer born again Christian. Makes one think, on either side of the issue. Both pose very powerful arguments from their positions.

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A Power Governments Cannot Suppress by Howard Zinn

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A Power Governments Cannot Suppress, is a major new collection of essays on American history, class, immigration, justice, and ordinary citizens who have made a difference. Zinn addresses America’s current political/ethical crisis using lessons learned from our nation’s history. Zinn brings a profoundly human, yet uniquely American perspective to each subject he writes about, whether it’s the abolition of war, terrorism, the Founding Fathers, the Holocaust, defending the rights of immigrants, or personal liberties. Written in an accessible, personal tone, Zinn approaches the telling of U.S. history from an active, engaged point of view. “America’s future is linked to how we understand our past,” writes Zinn; “For this reason, writing about history, for me, is never a neutral act.”

Zinn frames the book with an opening essay titled “If History is to be Creative,” a reflection on the role and responsibility of the historian. “To think that history-writing must aim simply to recapitulate the failures that dominate the past,” writes Zinn, “is to make historians collaborators in an endless cycle of defeat.” “If history is to be creative, to anticipate a possible future without denying the past, it should, I believe, emphasize new possibilities by disclosing those hidden episodes of the past when, even if in brief flashes, people showed their ability to resist, to join together, and occasionally win. I am supposing, or perhaps only hoping, that our future may be found in the past’s fugitive moments of compassion rather than in its solid centuries of warfare.”

Buzzing with stories and ideas, Zinn draws upon fascinating, little-known historical anecdotes spanning from the Declaration of Independence to the USA PATRIOT Act to comment on the most controversial issues facing us today: government dishonesty, how to respond to terrorism, the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the loss of our liberties, immigration, and the responsibility of the citizen to confront power for the common good.

Considered a “modern-day Thoreau” by Jonathon Kozol, Zinn’s inspired writings address the reader as an active participant in history making. “We live in a beautiful country,” writes Zinn, in the book’s opening chapter. “But people who have no respect for human life, freedom, or justice have taken it over. It is now up to all of us to take it back.”

Featuring essays penned over an eight-year period, A Power Governments Cannot Suppress is Howard Zinn’s first writerly work in several years, an invaluable post-9/11-era addition to the themes that run through his bestselling classic, A People’s History Of the United States.

Howard Zinn is a veteran of World War II and author of many books and plays, including the million-selling classic, A People’s History of the United States. For more information about Howard and his speaking schedule see http://www.citylights.com

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The Welfare State: No Mercy For The Middle Class by John McKay/Joel Turtel, Joel Turtel

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Wouldn’t it be great if we never had to pay income taxes or social security taxes again? What if we could keep every cent we earn from our paycheck, giving government not a penny of our hard-earned money?
This is all possible, but only if and when we totally dismantle the welfare state. You see, the welfare state means big governement, and big government is a tax-hog that eats your earnings.

John McKay, in his book “The Welfare State: No Mercy For The Middle Class,” explains how we are being ripped off by the welfare state. He examines the central ideas that are used to justify the welfare state, and shows why these ideas are false and evil.

The author explains why, even in the midst of a seeming economic boom, most families find it hard to keep their heads above water. He explains how welfare-state regulations sharply increase the price of everything we buy, and progressive income taxes loot almost 40% of our paychecks.

He shows how this government-cr! eated pincer is strangling the average American’s standard of living and his children’s future. He reveals how taxes and regulations make houses, health care, and college educations for our children unaffordable to millions of Americans.

Mr. McKay also explains the disaster we are heading for if we don’t bring government under control. He also shows us how to avert this disaster. The author proposes a startling new amendment to the Constitution that would end the welfare state, once and for all. He shows how much better our lives would be once this amendment was in place: Taxes would be slashed to less than $300 per year, total. No more income taxes, no more social security taxes, no more hundreds of other taxes. Small business owners would breathe free because most regulations would be eliminated. Millions of new jobs would be created. The cost of living for everything from houses to health care would be slashed. And government would be off our backs.

For a startling in! sight into how much better our lives would be once we end t! he welfare state, read “The Welfare State: No Mercy For The Middle Class.”

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“Constitutional Chaos” by Judge Andrew P. Napolitano

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An excellent eye opening book to the facts of the day where politicians make the laws, but don’t feel obligated to follow them; only we little people must follow them. Makes you wonder exactly what they are thinking other than Aristocracy, eh? It seems to be a much more abbreviated version of “Gulag Archipelago” by Solzhenitsyn, which in turn was based upon the Soviet forced labor camps – where a good Russian was defined by his term in the Siberian Gulags. Hmmmmm, a rather odd way to determine one’s worth in society, don’t you think?

Based upon much of his time in the legal system, on the bench, etc. Judge Napolitano has a great many tales of disdainful legal antics, and as time goes on it tends to get much worse.

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“Constitution in Exile” by Judge Andrew Napolitano

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Of the three books (at that time) I found this to be the most thought provoking and the most challenging to that which I had learned growing up.  Growing up you are taught a great number of things, historically; however, to have the audacity to question what you were taught was unthinkable!  As you get older, possibly become wiser and more cynical – you end up questioning most, if not everything.  This book presented many points-of-fact from history and I began to see our history in a completely different light…the blinders were officially off!  This book should be just the beginning in lifting the blinders from your eyes and enable you to see past the revisionist history we were taught.  You may think the history became re-written within the 20th century, but it went as far back as President Adams with the Alien and Sedition Act of 1798.  Hmmmmmmm!  Our politicians have been tugging at our shirt-tails since the beginning, you ask?  Yes, indeed…they have been doing that and more.

George Santayanna once wrote, in essence, that a people who do not study their history are destined to repeat all their mistakes, again and again!  This is one book that illustrates the repetitiveness of our ignorance to history, both ours and the world.

Godspeed & Good Read to all!

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