Tag Archives: leader

You Don’t Need a Title To Be a Leader: How Anyone, Anywhere, Can Make a Positive Difference by Mark Sanborn


In his inspiring new book, You Don’t Need a Title to Be a Leader, Mark Sanborn, the author of the national bestseller The Fred Factor, shows how each of us can be a leader in our daily lives and make a positive difference, whatever our title or position.  Through the stories of a number of unsung heroes, Sanborn reveals the keys each one of us can use to improve our organizations and enhance our careers.  Genuine leadership – leadership with a “little l”, as he puts it, is not conferred by a title, or limited to the executive suite. Rather, it is shown through our everyday actions and the way we influence the lives of those around us. Among the qualities that genuine leaders share:
• Acting with purpose rather than getting bogged down by mindless activity

• Caring about and listening to others

• Looking for ways to encourage the contributions and development of others rather than focusing solely on personal achievements

• Creating a legacy of accomplishment and contribution in everything they do
As readers across the country discovered in The Fred Factor, Mark Sanborn has an unparalleled ability to explain fundamental business and leadership truths through simple stories and anecdotes. You Don’t Need a Title to Be a Leader offers an inspiring message to anyone who wants to take control of their life and make a positive difference.

A valuable resource in order to reconcile the fact that one is not automatically a leader because of title, as men do not follow titles. But they do follow because of loyalty and knowing how much you care for them!

Worth the time to read as you can pick up a number of tips in order to better yourself in the eyes of your subordinates and peers!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Beyond Band of Brothers: The war memoirs of Major Dick Wintersby Dick Winters, Cole C. Kingseed

They were called Easy Company—but their mission was never easy. Immortalized as the Band of Brothers, they suffered 150% casualties while liberating Europe—an unparalleled record of bravery under fire. Dick Winters was their commander—”the best combat leader in World War II” to his men. This is his story—told in his own words for the first time.
On D-Day, Dick Winters parachuted into France and assumed leadership of the Band of Brothers when their commander was killed. He led them through the Battle of the Bulge and into Germany, by which time each member had been wounded. They liberated an S.S. death camp from the horrors of the Holocaust and captured Berchtesgaden, Hitler’s alpine retreat. After briefly serving during the Korean War, Winters was a highly successful businessman. Made famous by Stephen Ambrose’s book Band of Brothers—and the subsequent award-winning HBO miniseries—he is the object of worldwide adulation.

dw-leadership

This was, without doubt, a great companion book to “Band of Brothers”! While much of it was encompassed within the HBO mini series, some things were more informative about Dick Winters – the man. I loved his synopsis of leadership skills, and/or traits, LEADERSHIP AT THE POINT OF A BAYONET, which by the way was the last page of the book. Though, he spoke of the problem in his book, most war survivors do not speak of their time at war. My father included. I believe this to be a travesty to our kids, because our children should come to understand to ramification of war. Unfortunately, governments and others needing bodies for a war effort will tend to glorify and even romanticize by incorporating patriotism, but this is so far from the truth! Our children need to view things such as the HBO mini series, read books such as this, etc. in order to make an educated, eyes-wide-open decision to become part of the war effort. I learned a great deal from this book and the mini series; more than I did from my father. I did learn that my oldest sister knew more of what my father endured in the European theater during WWII than I had ever known. That tid-bit didn’t come until after my mother’s passing in 2012, he had passed away in 1989. I believe Abraham Lincoln said it best:

lincoln-on-war

There was a quote, not certain to whom it is attributed, but in essence: “If people knew what happened in time of war, there would be no more war!”

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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