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The Christian, The Court and The Constitution by Jay Alan Sekulow

christian-court-constitution

An overview of the Christian’s civil rights.

Well written and a great amount of information concerning YOUR rights as a Christian in school or in the work force. A quick and worthwhile read. Many choose to yield their rights because they are intimidated, but your rights are protected and paramount!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Covenant Relationships: A Handbook for Integrity and Loyalty by Asher Intrater

CovenantRelationships

Discover the Biblical Blueprint for Building Relationships that Last!

Even though the topic of relationships is very popular, few individuals ever reach the point of building deep, lasting, and meaningful bonds with others. Why do our connections with other people seem to stay superficial and never go beyond the surface-level? Because we’ve drifted away from the Biblical blueprint of what covenant relationships are intended to look like.

In this revised and updated edition of Asher Intrater’s classic, Covenant Relationships, you will receive time-tested practical keys that show you how to build relationships that:

Are spiritually and emotionally fulfilling for everyone involved.  Remain intact and solid, even in the middle of conflict and disagreement.  Reflect the timeless values outlined in Scripture.  Free people to truly be known by and share life with others.Relationships are the meaning of life! 

It’s time to move past the popular “take-it or leave-it” approach and build deep connections based on loyalty, authenticity and covenant.

For God’s people to rise up and walk in new dimensions of love and effectiveness, we must be knit together in covenant relationships!

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I was a little taken aback due to the lack of “T”s throughout the titling of sections. I was a bit concerned that it was a bad book, or poor selection. However the overall demeanor of the book was truly enlightening and full of wisdom. It aided me in understanding relationships…and yes, even at 56 I can learn a thing or two on relationship building!

It is truly a wonderful book if you can get past the appearance of bad spelling (i.e. , no “T”s in the titles of the sections throughout the book itself.)

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

 

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Reagan: The Life by H.W. Brands

reagan

In his magisterial new biography, H. W. Brands brilliantly establishes Ronald Reagan as one of the two great presidents of the twentieth century, a true peer to Franklin Roosevelt. Reagan conveys with sweep and vigor how the confident force of Reagan’s personality and the unwavering nature of his beliefs enabled him to engineer a conservative revolution in American politics and play a crucial role in ending communism in the Soviet Union. Reagan shut down the age of liberalism, Brands shows, and ushered in the age of Reagan, whose defining principles are still powerfully felt today.

    Employing archival sources not available to previous biographers and drawing on dozens of interviews with surviving members of Reagan’s administration, Brands has crafted a richly detailed and fascinating narrative of the presidential years. He offers new insights into Reagan’s remote management style and fractious West Wing staff, his deft handling of public sentiment to transform the tax code, and his deeply misunderstood relationship with Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, on which nothing less than the fate of the world turned.

     Reagan is a storytelling triumph, an irresistible portrait of an underestimated politician whose pragmatic leadership and steadfast vision transformed the nation.

Reagan was a great President with a practical outlook and plan of attack on the subjects at hand. While there were some low points in his tenure, there were some great accomplishments. He was a trusting man, but he was not a god (as so many speak of him as such.) Brands has definitely hit the nail squarely on the head with this book of his. It was a great read and the topic was on such a great person, in President Reagan.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

 

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They Thought They Had More Time: I Saw the Day of the Lord by David Jones

more time

Believe it or not… Jesus is coming!

David Jones received a vision that changed his life forever. It was as if someone gripped him by the arm and shook him awake. In an instant, he was hovering above the earth. Beautiful clear skies. Mountains and hills adorning the landscape below. People were continuing with business as usual, until

Thick clouds consumed the sky.
Darkness fell.
Silence covered the earth.

Then, a deafening sound broke through the heavens and pierced every ear that heard it. Terror gripped the people, as they realized the Day of the Lord was not a fable. It had come and they had run out of time.

As you experience this vision for yourself, Jones’ book will:

Empower you to live every moment with eternal significance Teach how to prepare for the end times Show you how to get right with God Learn to live every day ready for His return!

A worthy read to prepare yourself for the worse case. Many Christians, and non-believers, will be surprised at the day of their judgement. When they hear the words, Assuredly, I say to you, I do not know you. What a travesty and let down in your heart that will be! Well worth your time to read, but there is much doctrine that one will have to pick through. A good book overall.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

 

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A History of God The 4,000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam by Karen Armstrong

Abridged download

Is the Universe wholly apart from God, or is Creation in some sense, a part of God? Is God solely One in nature, or is there a Threeness, or a Manyness, or an Infinitude to God? Is God knowable or beyond knowledge? Is God personal or impersonal? Does God have feelings? Billions of people have had an opinion on these matters, and that’s the subject of this groundbreaking book. Those who depend upon the unshakeableness of their beliefs may find this book upsetting or worse, but to those who consider and question their faith, Karen Armstrong’s A History of God will be challenging and illuminating, and perhaps, as I found it, even thrilling.

The title goes for brevity over accuracy. Perhaps it could have been titled “A History of the Idea of God in Judaism, Christianity and Islam,” but that would have lacked panáche, to say the least. Armstrong concentrates on the changes in the concept of God, particularly the unique aspects of monotheistic theology, for instance, God as separate from Creation, God having a “personal” nature, and so forth.

religious cultures in conflict

Armstrong makes theological history simply fascinating. Beginning with the evidence for near-universal worship of a Sky God in prehistory, Armstrong traces the shift from the Sky God to the Earth Mother to polytheism, and then focuses on the revolutionary development of Abraham’s faith in one God which would clash with Canaanite, Egyptian, and Mesopotamian paganism for the next 1500 years. Many Christians interested in objective Biblical scholarship are familiar with the “Documentary Hypothesis” of the Pentateuch stemming from sources J, E, P, and D. Yet never have I seen an attempt to reconstruct the history and interplay of these perspectives throughout ancient Israel and the surrounding regions, and not in my wildest dreams would I have imagined it would be so illuminating…

For instance, Armstrong shows the revolutionary effect of the prophets in Judaism, beginning with Isaiah, at the time when the J and E material was still being written. She shows that prophetic Judaism was an “Axial religion,” a development of the Axial age when cities became the centers of culture in Asia and the Mediterranean. Other Axial religious developments included the teachings of Socrates, Plato, Zoroaster, the Upanishadic sages, the Buddha, Lao-tse, and Confucius. These all taught a universal ethic, insisting that God or the Absolute needed no temple, transcended all, was accessible to or within everyone, and that compassion was the highest virtue.

The prophets’ teaching that “God desires mercy, and not sacrifice,” was in sharp contrast to the priestly, Temple-based establishment, which insisted the Temple was the ultimate dwelling on God on Earth, having chosen the Israel out of all the nations. (This was the beginning of a clash which would endure until John the Baptist and the ministry of Jesus.)

But this is just the beginning. Instead of specializing on a single religion or period in time, Armstrong boldly takes up all the threads of theology throughout the four millennia of the monotheistic religions. With them, she weaves a tapestry of our collective religious experience which can help us understand our faith and ourselves better. Subsequent chapters focus on the life of Christ, early Christian theologies, understandings (and misunderstandings) of Trinity, the influence of Greek philosophy upon Christianity and Islam, mysticism, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, and Fundamentalism.

three persons or three personae?

A special treat is her insight on Trinitarian thought. It was a surprise to learn that the term “persons” in “One God in three Persons” came from the Latin word personae, referring to the masks of characters in a drama. Personae was the Latin translation of the Greek word hypostases, “expressions.”  The different words used in Greek and Latin to describe the Trinity reflected (and influenced) very different understandings of God’s nature. For the Eastern bishops, the Trinity described how One God, whose essence (ousia) is mysterious, ineffable, utterly beyond and above being known or described in any way, imparts his energies (energeia) to Creation through the expressions (hypostases) of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. In other words, the Eastern view of the Trinity reconciled knowledge of God as both personal and beyond personal, knowing and loving in his expressions, and yet beyond any human conception at all in essence. Have you ever heard it like that before?

world-wide paradigm shifts

Brilliant also is her ability to relate the historic phenomena of mysticism, reformation, rationalism, and fundamentalism beyond just the Christian perspective, into a world-wide perspective simultaneously developing in all “the religions of God.” Her revelation that the Reformation was not just a Protestant reformation, but a universal one is a brilliant example. As the printing press spread, the authority of the written word took on unprecedented dimensions. Galileo, she points out, was condemned by the Catholic Church not because his heliocentric universe conflicted with any doctrine or dogma, but because it contradicted an extremely literal reading of the Bible.

Especially helpful is her knowledge about Islamic history with revealing treatments on philosophical and mystical eras in Islam, before the relatively recent phenomenon of Islamic Fundamentalism. It was fascinating to learn that some Sufi schools were so devoted to Jesus that they adapted the Shahada to “there is no God but God, and Jesus is His Prophet.”

Despite five well-earned frims, A History of God has minor but significant flaws: Awkward sentences abound, and her lack of direct experience with conservative American Protestantism makes her disdain for it seem less than objective. Furthermore, errors like “Maurice Cerullo” (i.e. Morris Cerullo) make it feel insufficiently edited, particularly in the age of the Internet. However, none of these are fatal flaws by any means; Armstrong has created a landmark work, undoubtedly unique in its combination of depth and scope. What can I say, but read it!

+++++++++

This was a worthy read, though I felt I could not pin down precisely where the author’s beliefs lie. There was a great amount of philosophical input (both pro & con), also there was a good amount of information as it related to several differing sects of Christianity, and information concerning the Islamic faith. However, I felt that she was a bit disingenuous with respect to the information presented about the Islamic faith. She had mentioned that Islam was, in essence, a successful coalescing religion which brought together and united the many clans (never once mentioning the warfare onslaught in order to do so, nor any mention of the believe in Allah or die ultimatum.) She touted that there was no compulsion in religion, yet time and again the Quran states (emphatically) or infers that there would be death to the non-believers.

Over all, I thought it was a decent-good read with much unknown information, philosophies, and other religious input. Worthy of the time it took to read. I feel a bit wiser as I understand a few things better, I have been made aware of a few things I didn’t know before, and I understand how others can be misguided as they do not do enough adequate research into their fields of study. They take what is written as truth and leave it there.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Adopting The Minimalist Mindset: How To Live With Less, Downsize, And Get More Fulfillment From Life by Brian Night

LivingLess

A new revolution is currently taking place, one that looks set to change how we view ourselves and the objects around us. This new, groundbreaking revolution is the practice of minimalism. In a society consumed by debt, greed, and envy, this new trend looks to change the way we think about everything in our lives. We spend our entire lives chasing happiness by chasing our peers, consuming, and collecting goods. But with depression and anxiety at all time highs, this trend is clearly not working.

This Book Will Discuss:

The benefits of minimalism
How to practice minimalism
How to organize your home and your life
How to remove your ego from purchasing decisions
The habits of highly effective minamalists
How to cut your bills
Over 50 tips saving money, cutting bills, and spending time on your true passions
Much, much, more!
This has led to the rapid rise of a new age of living: living simply. The minimalist focuses more on time and presence then on objects. Happiness, helping others, and self-fulfillment are at the top of minimalists’ priorities. They realize that happiness does not come from consumption, but that true happiness comes from within. Spending time creating memorable moments is a much better experience then spending time on a new object.

A very quick read and informative. Just chock full of ideas to minimalize one’s life. A valuable read if you are looking to go minimal in your life.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Righteous Indignation: Excuse Me While I Save the World! by Andrew Breitbart

RighteousIndignation

Known for his network of conservative websites that draws millions of readers everyday, Andrew Breitbart has one main goal: to make sure the “liberally biased” major news outlets in this country cover all aspects of a story fairly. Breitbart is convinced that too many national stories are slanted by the news media in an unfair way.

In RIGHTEOUS INDIGNATION, Breitbart talks about how one needs to deal with the liberal news world head on. Along the way, he details his early years, working with Matt Drudge, the Huffington Post, and how Breitbart developed his unique style of launching key websites to help get the word out to conservatives all over.

A rollicking and controversial read, Breitbart will certainly raise your blood pressure, one way or another.

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I found this book to be extraordinarily written, in that it was aimed toward those people who need every possible aid in defending their view with respect to the Liberal Progressive mind set. If you are looking to get into the game, not necessarily politics or television or the media, but you are seeking a way to get your point across without giving up your ethics or moral standards. Many see themselves having to compromise in their morals or ethics, but you don’t.

Sadly, instead of having a discussion with some people actually becomes hard work when they have a Liberal, Progressive, Socialistic, or Communistic position. You do have to be a bit brash in order to get your point across, but do you actually think you will change their minds? Probably not, all you can hope for (from my experiences in evangelizing or witnessing to non-Christians) is to plant a seed in their minds.

Andrew Breitbart was a Liberal minded progressive person, by his own admission and by the indoctrination that he had gone throughout his schooling. But he was steered away from it through the ideas of others and began to think for himself. In his first chapter he showed that he repeated much of what he had been told and his mind was on autopilot…then he learned what he was doing and began to relearn things and became the man he was destined to be!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Fred 2.0: New Ideas on How to Keep Delivering Extraordinary Results by Mark Sanborn

Fred20

Nine years ago, bestselling author and business consultant Mark Sanborn introduced the world to Fred, his postman, who delivered extraordinary service in simple but remarkable ways. Fred’s story inspired millions. Companies–even, cities–were inspired to turn the ordinary into the extraordinary each day.

Today, with stiff competition from the networked global economy, delivering extraordinary results is more important than ever. With Fred 2.0, Mark not only revisits the original Fred to gain new insights, but also equips all of us with new strategies to achieve more. You’ll not only be inspired by Fred 2.0, you’ll also have the tools and strategies to aim higher and achieve the extraordinary.

This was the follow-up to THE FRED FACTOR. While I have not read that book, yet; this one does give you insights as to how you can be a better Fred, Fred Shea that is. But, in a nutshell, the Fred Factor and Fred 2.0 are about the Biblical mind of the Golden Rule, loving your neighbor as yourself…but is more of a business use, not just a personal life venture. Although, by treating everyone as you would like to be treated, regardless of business or personal life will make your life a whole lot easier! No discerning is necessary as to who must be treated how…treat everyone you meet and come in contact with with love and respect! Go that extra mile with each person. THAT is the Biblical mindset!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Victory at Any Cost: The Genius of Viet Nam’s Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap by Cecil B. Currey

Victory

Tells the full story of the man who fought three of the world’s great powers—and won. Cecil B. Currey makes clear one primary reason why America lost the Vietnam War: Vo Nguyen Giap. He has written the definitive biography of one of history’s greatest generals.

Unlike Generals throughout history, believing they must occupy the high ground, Giap grasped the hearts of the people. This was an extraordinary story of one of the most prolific Generals in the history of mankind. Starting with nothing he built up an army of citizens who focused on the people.

An excellent read and one of those books yous should place on the back-burner to read. I, personally, found it to be a true page turner.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Living with Purpose: Devotions for Discovering Your God-Given Potential Kindle Edition by Myles Munroe

living

Inspiration That Will Unlock Your Potential and Release Your Destiny!

You were made for greatness, not mediocrity.

Every human being was formed in the image and likeness of the Creator—a God of purpose and destiny. In turn, it is Heaven’s perfect plan for you to maximize your life, fulfill your destiny and live with a sense of divine purpose!

In the Living With Purpose devotional, you will receive access to Biblical wisdom and spiritual insights that will help you face your day with increased vision and live your life with a greater sense of destiny.

Dr. Myles Munroe was more than a revolutionary ministry leader and bestselling author; he was a prophetic voice who called forth potential in the lives of those to whom he ministered. Through this collection of his timeless teachings on purpose and potential, Dr. Munroe encourages you to dream bigger, inspires your vision, and empowers your potential!

It’s time for you to live with divine purpose!

An inspiring book that will lead you through a biblical journey to search for your specific purpose in this life, in order to glorify God! A worthy and fast read, for certain.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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