Tag Archives: military

Spirit Warriors: Strategies for the Battles Christian Men and Women Face Every Day by Stu Weber

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Pastor and former Green Beret captain Stu Weber reveals the crucial spiritual battles that all Christians face constantly, whether or not they are aware of them. “Somehow we have come to mistakenly associate spiritual warfare with charismatic personalities strutting across brightly lit platforms … whuppin’ up on evil spirits,” says Weber. “But spiritual warfare is so much more than a show.” With warm and winning counsel, the bestselling author/speaker warns of the very real perils readers face, giving them what they need to survive and thrive.

Paying attention to what is happening around you, daily, and to what the Word of God (Bible) is saying are two of the greatest elements to this present battle of Spiritual warfare. You MUST choose God’s word over the words of man. You MUST choose the full armor of God rather than the armor of this world…you will be severely unprepared.

A MUST read book with a MUST listen to message!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Filed under Apologetic, Books, christian, eBook, Education, Evangelistic, Faith, Issues, Ministry, Missions, Reading, Religious, war

pegasus

In the early morning hours of June 6, 1944, a small detachment of British airborne troops stormed the German defense forces and paved the way for the Allied invasion of Europe. Pegasus Bridge was the first engagement of D-Day, the turning point of World War II.

This gripping account of it by acclaimed author Stephen Ambrose brings to life a daring mission so crucial that, had it been unsuccessful, the entire Normandy invasion might have failed. Ambrose traces each step of the preparations over many months to the minute-by-minute excitement of the hand-to-hand confrontations on the bridge. This is a story of heroism and cowardice, kindness and brutality—the stuff of all great adventures.

Just one aspect of the D-Day invasion which was a turning point of the war, in some aspects. Well written and a short read. Something for a lazy day at home in order to learn a little bit more on the topic of World War II. Stephen Ambrose has numerous books, which he has written on the subject of topic : WWII. Check out some of his other books as well if you like this one…you will love BAND OF BROTHERS. Of course, there are other topics he has written on.

Godspeed and Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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1775: A Good Year for Revolution by Kevin Phillips & Arthur Morey

1775

What if the year we have long commemorated as America’s defining moment was in fact misleading? What if the real events that signaled the historic shift from colony to country took place earlier, and that the true story of our nation’s emergence reveals a more complicated―and divisive―birth process?

In this major new work, iconoclastic historian and political chronicler Kevin Phillips upends the conventional reading of the American Revolution by puncturing the myth that 1776 was the struggle’s watershed year. Mythology and omission have elevated 1776, but the most important year, rarely recognized, was 1775: the critical launching point of the war and Britain’s imperial outrage and counterattack and the year during which America’s commitment to revolution took bloody and irreversible shape.

Phillips focuses on the great battlefields and events of 1775―Congress’s warlike economic ultimatums to king and parliament, New England’s rage militaire, the panicked concentration of British troops in militant but untenable Boston, the stunning expulsion of royal governors up and down the seaboard, and the new provincial congresses and many hundreds of local committees that quickly reconstituted local authority in Patriot hands. These onrushing events delivered a sweeping control of territory and local government to the Patriots, one that Britain was never able to overcome. 1775 was the year in which Patriots captured British forts and fought battles from the Canadian frontier to the Carolinas, obtained the needed gunpowder in machinations that reached from the Baltic to West Africa and the Caribbean, and orchestrated the critical months of nation building in the backrooms of a secrecy-shrouded Congress. As Phillips writes, “The political realignment achieved amid revolution was unique―no other has come with simultaneous ballots and bullets.”

Surveying the political climate, economic structures, and military preparations, as well as the roles of ethnicity, religion, and class, Phillips tackles the eighteenth century with the same skill and perception he has shown in analyzing contemporary politics and economics. He mines rich material as he surveys different regions and different colonies and probes how the varying agendas and expectations at the grassroots level had a huge effect on how the country shaped itself. He details often overlooked facts about the global munitions trade; about the roles of Indians, slaves, and mercenaries; and about the ideological and religious factors that played into the revolutionary fervor.

The result is a dramatic account brimming with original insights about the country we eventually became. Kevin Phillips’s 1775 revolutionizes our understanding of America’s origins.

This book, in my opinion, is perhaps the greatest historical account from numerous sources (American, British, Spanish, and French archives) which details the not just the infancy of the Revolutionary War, but also to it’s maturity. A great resource, though it may be a tough read at times it is without a doubt a great worthwhile read for those interested in the Revolutionary War time period.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Filed under Books, Education, History, Issues, Politics, Religious, Uncategorized

Your Government Failed You by RICHARD A. CLARKE


An analysis of America’s national security policies evaluates the U.S. government’s mistakes and why they have occurred, in a report that poses alternative. While this was written in 2008, many of the bureaucratic nightmares either got worse or catastrophic. With the government, things are advertised as getting better or solved; but in reality they only get worse. The bad behavior is given accolades and the whistle blowers are treated as criminals. Unfortunately, their motto has been and, more likely than not, will remain:

“Good enough for government work!”

It is truly sad, if you do not believe me then just watch some of the documentaries that are out there. Between the ones that are privately done and those promoted by the government, you will get a pretty clear picture of what is going on.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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