Tag Archives: political

What You Need to Know about Islam and Muslims by George W. Braswell

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Geared toward both the student and the interested general reader, What You Need to Know About Islam and Muslims is an all-you-need-to-know-and-more book about the Islam. Written in simple language, this book describes to Christians the story of Islam and the Muslim people, and their aggressive plans to establish Islam in every culture.

An intriguing book on the knowledge about the religion of Islam and the Muslim practices. While this does not go truly in depth to explain doctrines of the beliefs, but what they believe overall. Touching on many of the discrepancies of the teachings about Jesus. Truly a remarkable work and truly a worthy read on the subject!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Brainwashed: How Universities Indoctrinate America’s Youth by Ben Shapiro

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When parents send their children off to college, mom and dad hope they’ll return more cultivated, knowledgeable, and astute–able to see issues from all points of view. But, according to Ben Shapiro, there’s only one view allowed on most college campuses: a rabid brand of liberalism that must be swallowed hook, line, and sinker. In this explosive book, Ben Shapiro, a college student himself, reveals how America’s university system is one of the largest brainwashing machines on the planet. Examining this nationwide problem from firsthand experience, Shapiro shows how the leftists who dominate the universities–from the administration to the student government, from the professors to the student media–use their power to mold impressionable minds. Fresh and bitterly funny, this book proves that the universities, far from being a place for open discussion, are really dungeons of the mind that indoctrinate students to become socialists, atheists, race-baiters, and narcissists.

This is an excellent primer for those intending to go into the university system, either as a student or an academic. While this is not a universal truth by any stretch of the imagination, it is quite telling of the university mindset and academia.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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How to Debate Leftists and Destroy Them: 11 Rules for Winning the Argument Kindle Edition by Ben Shapiro

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The problem, as Ben Shapiro puts it in this must-read, is that “because conservatives don’t think about how to win that they constantly lose” in confrontations with leftists. The solution is to stop taking the bullying and learning to argue for victory.
Among Shapiro’s rules for beating the left in confrontations are:
Be willing to take a punch. (conservatives tend to shy away from confrontations because the left is rhetorically violent; but it is important “to walk toward the fire.” )
Hit hard, hit first. (leftists stage muggings; instead of fighting by Marquis of Queensberry rules, conservatives need to accept the strategy Mike Tyson: “Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.”)
Immediately frame the debate. (“When you’re discussing global warming , for example, the proper question is not whether man is causing global warming but whether man can fix global warming—a question to which the universally acknowledged answer is no unless we are willing to revert to the pre industrial age.”)
There are eight more rules that will allow a conservative to debate a leftist and destroy him. How to Debate Leftists and Destroy Them is not just a “how to” book. It is a survival manual.

By far one of the most succinct and to the point discussions on debating someone from the opposite side of the isle (i.e., a leftest minded liberal.) Just as discussed in his book that the left has one play to knock you down and get you off your game. But a debate with a liberal minded individual is, in fact, a war. And you must be willing to strike first and strike hard! And keep striking until they are finished. This is one of the greatest failing of the conservative movement because they believe that they can overcome all these hits with something substantive…but people only see and understand when you have been knocked out…we all have this failing because we were brought up, overall with a sense of fair play. But in a war, all stops must be pulled and you must be willing to win the war, not just the argument.

Without a doubt, a very good read and worthwhile information! It is a short book and would & could very easily be put to memory and to the test!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Fools Crow: Wisdom and Power by Thomas E. Mails

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Frank Fools Crow is regarded by many as the greatest Native American holy person of the last hundred years. Nephew of Black Elk, and a disciplined, gentle, spiritual and political leader, Fools Crow died in 1989 at the age of 99. Fools Crow: Wisdom and Power is the only book to reveal, often in his own words, the philosophy and practice of this historic leader.
Over a period of years beginning in 1974, author Thomas E. Mails met many times with the remarkable Sioux holy man Frank Fools Crow, and was entrusted with the powerful, transformative and healing teachings of this important leader. Fools Crow healed and touched many lives, and continues to do so in this cherished classic of Native American spirituality.
This edition of Fools Crow: Wisdom and Power includes additional photos of Fools Crow (some previously unpublished), an afterword with an overview of the great teacher’s Seven Ways of Healing, and a foreword by Russell Means.

I have always had a respect for the Native American Indian and their respect & reverence of the earth & environment. Many of their beliefs concerning land ownership…it wasn’t theirs. Their use of what was needed versus the white man’s get/use all that you can…what we don’t need we can sell. Very wasteful! The Native American Indian lived simply, lived off the land and without destroying it. I still have a fondness, ideally & pragmatically speaking. Of course, their simplistic way of life was their undoing.

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Democracy in America (Penguin Classics) by Alexis de Tocqueville

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In 1831 Alexis de Tocqueville, a young French aristocrat and ambitious civil servant, made a nine-month journey throughout America. The result was Democracy in America, a monumental study of the life and institutions of the evolving nation. Tocqueville looked to the flourishing democratic system in America as a possible model for post-revolutionary France, believing that the egalitarian ideals it enshrined reflected the spirit of the age and even divine will. His insightful work has become one of the most influential political texts ever written on America and an indispensable authority on democracy.

This new edition is the only one that contains all Tocqueville’s writings on America, including the rarely-translated Two Weeks in the Wilderness, an account of Tocqueville’s travels in Michigan among the Iroquois, and Excursion to Lake Oneida.

To one degree it was a hard read, on the other hand it was a valuable & good read, and in other respects it tends to leave you hanging. In-that, wondering where he made certain conclusions…based upon who’s input, etc. It has been well over ten years since I read it and believe I should read it once again.

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Cycles of American Political Thought

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Professor Joseph F. Kobylka
Southern Methodist UniversityPh.D., University of Minnesota
The Great Courses

Course No. 4820

While this was not a book, it is a noteworthy course.

America is often described as a nation of doers. Its folk heroes are men and women of action, like Daniel Boone and Annie Oakley, who subdued an untamed wilderness on the way to forging a great nation. But is that the whole story? Is American history really just a tale of dynamic movers and shakers who left philosophizing to their European counterparts?
In Cycles of American Political Thought, you’ll examine the often neglected philosophical underpinnings of this nation’s history. With renowned political scientist Professor Joseph F. Kobylka as your guide, you’ll explore how this nation of “doers” has, from its birth, been deeply engaged with the most fundamental questions of political philosophy.

Over the course of 36 engaging lectures, Professor Kobylka weaves a tale of nation-founding and nation-building. You’ll learn how, from its earliest days, the nation has borne the imprint of influential thinkers from the European continent, from the Reformation theology of John Calvin to the Enlightenment philosophy of John Locke. You’ll examine how these ideas have influenced the greatest Americans as, over the centuries, the nation has cycled between variants of a single revolutionary political theory.

But America’s story is not simply one of ideas. From the Civil War to the civil rights movement, the Industrial Revolution to the Great Depression, Professor Kobylka’s analysis shows how the actions and events of history have both affected and been influenced by underlying political philosophies.

The Ever-Changing Definition of “America”
Throughout this epic historical journey, you’ll explore the many ways this nation has answered the question: “What is an American?” Professor Kobylka traces the many answers that have been offered over the centuries, showing how the idea of “We the People” has changed and expanded far beyond the founding fathers’ original conception.

And just as the definition of what it means to be an American expands, so the ideas about governance have changed and grown. We’ll navigate this ever-shifting political landscape and see how political trends in American history can be understood as variations on a single theme: the philosophy of liberalism. Derived from the writings of Enlightenment philosopher John Locke, this conception of government is the source of some of our most deeply valued political notions, such as the idea that government is designed to serve the needs of the people. Professor Kobylka shows how the many twists and turns of the nation’s history can be seen as a cycling back and forth between competing interpretations of this foundational political theory.

Founding Fathers and Freedom Fighters
You’ll also meet the unforgettable men and women who, over the course of American history, have molded political thought and policy. We’ll see how our most beloved leaders—Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Ronald Reagan—acted from deeply felt philosophical convictions about government, and how apolitical observers—such as philosopher Henry David Thoreau and essayist J. Hector St. John de Crèvecoeur—offered insights into the strengths and shortcomings of American liberalism.

Our journey through the American political landscape includes the critics and activists who demanded equal access to the nation’s promise of equality and liberty. We’ll meet some of the courageous figures who fought to redress deeply rooted inequities, including abolitionist Frederick Douglass and suffragist Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Understanding the Past, Understanding the Present
Through Cycles of American Political Thought, you’ll gain a deep understanding both of the nation’s past and how this rich political history continues to influence us today. Even if you’ve studied American history before, you’ll encounter something new: a unique synthesis of viewpoints, ideas, and events that’s enlightening and compelling.

And while the story is epic, you’ll never lose your way. Professor Kobylka illuminates both the larger patterns of history and the finer details—the lives, events, and ideas that bring history to life. This course will change the way you think about American history.

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A History of Political Theory by George Sabine

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Theories of politics are themselves a aprt of politics. History has no concluding chapter. To write the whole history of Western political theory from this point of view, of social relativism, is probably a greater task than a careful scolar ought to have attempted.

Interesting, but boring, read. Had a wealth of information which was worthy of being read; unfortunately, the topic itself is not an all encompassing topic depicting fun…of course,I must admit I read it while convalescing from a hip replacement surgery. So, I had nowhere else to get to and wanted to get this book out of the read queue.

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