Tag Archives: religion

Divorcing God

DivorcingGod

Our founding fathers intended religion and morality to be pillars of the new republic, providing the restraint that would allow liberty for the citizenry. Today, this delicate balance of religion and state has been eroded by a secularist push to isolate Christianity in our culture and render it irrelevant. As a people, we either return to our Christian roots… or we divorce God altogether.

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There really is not much more I can add to this write-up “…we either return to our Christian roots… or we divorce God altogether.” This pretty much sums it up!

Godspeed & Good Views!

Doc Murf

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The Sermon On the Mount by Vincent Cheung

Sermon on the Mount

An exposition on the Sermon on the Mount. Topics covered include: the kingdom of God, the Christian counter-culture, the relevance of God’s law, the commandments on murder, adultery, divorce, oaths, retaliation, love, and Jesus’ teachings on biblical inerrancy, hypocritical piety, hypocritical judgment, legalism, materialism, exclusivism, and antinomianism.

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Vincent Cheung is a rather prolific writer with respect to the teachings of the bible and the words of Jesus. He is a no-holds-barred teacher who tells you in very brutal terms what is meant by the word of God! Sadly, I must agree with his style of teaching, wherein people within the Christian communities (as a whole) need that fire and brimstone sermons brought forth in their lives. We are now entering into a Politically Correct era where the bible has warned us that:

Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness, who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter. ~Isaiah 5:20 NIV

But regardless of what is to happen, we as Christians MUST, ABSOLUTELY MUST, stand up for what the word of God states. Unlike what many think, to speak truth is not evil…but to say nothing is to acquiesce to the evil at hand.

Great book! Great read! Well worth the time!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

ChristmasCarol

In October 1843, Charles Dickens ― heavily in debt and obligated to his publisher ― began work on a book to help supplement his family’s meagre income. That volume, A Christmas Carol, has long since become one of the most beloved stories in the English language. As much a part of the holiday season as holly, mistletoe, and evergreen wreaths, this perennial favourite continues to delight new readers and rekindle thoughts of charity and goodwill.

With its characters exhibiting many qualities ― as well as failures ― often ascribed to Dickens himself, the imaginative and entertaining tale relates Ebenezer Scrooge’s eerie encounters with a series of spectral visitors. Journeying with them through Christmases past, present, and future, he is ultimately transformed from an arrogant, obstinate, and insensitive miser to a generous, warm-hearted, and caring human being. Written by one of England’s greatest and most popular novelists, A Christmas Carol has come to epitomize the true meaning of Christmas.

[FREE DOWNLOAD] [YouTube Movie]

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I am always touched by this particular story. In fact, this is usually the first movie to watch as we put up our Christmas Tree for the season, as well as the first movie to watch as we dismantle the Christmas decorations around our house. I am especially fond of the 1951 black & white version with Alistair Sims in the lead role of the movie. It always tugs at my heart and makes me reflect upon my past, present, and potential future. The short story by Charles Dickens is slightly different, as most books are different from the movie counterparts. But it is so close to the story that I am so fond of. I hope you all will love this as much as I.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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They Thought They Had More Time: I Saw the Day of the Lord by David Jones

more time

Believe it or not… Jesus is coming!

David Jones received a vision that changed his life forever. It was as if someone gripped him by the arm and shook him awake. In an instant, he was hovering above the earth. Beautiful clear skies. Mountains and hills adorning the landscape below. People were continuing with business as usual, until

Thick clouds consumed the sky.
Darkness fell.
Silence covered the earth.

Then, a deafening sound broke through the heavens and pierced every ear that heard it. Terror gripped the people, as they realized the Day of the Lord was not a fable. It had come and they had run out of time.

As you experience this vision for yourself, Jones’ book will:

Empower you to live every moment with eternal significance Teach how to prepare for the end times Show you how to get right with God Learn to live every day ready for His return!

A worthy read to prepare yourself for the worse case. Many Christians, and non-believers, will be surprised at the day of their judgement. When they hear the words, Assuredly, I say to you, I do not know you. What a travesty and let down in your heart that will be! Well worth your time to read, but there is much doctrine that one will have to pick through. A good book overall.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

 

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A History of God The 4,000-Year Quest of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam by Karen Armstrong

Abridged download

Is the Universe wholly apart from God, or is Creation in some sense, a part of God? Is God solely One in nature, or is there a Threeness, or a Manyness, or an Infinitude to God? Is God knowable or beyond knowledge? Is God personal or impersonal? Does God have feelings? Billions of people have had an opinion on these matters, and that’s the subject of this groundbreaking book. Those who depend upon the unshakeableness of their beliefs may find this book upsetting or worse, but to those who consider and question their faith, Karen Armstrong’s A History of God will be challenging and illuminating, and perhaps, as I found it, even thrilling.

The title goes for brevity over accuracy. Perhaps it could have been titled “A History of the Idea of God in Judaism, Christianity and Islam,” but that would have lacked panáche, to say the least. Armstrong concentrates on the changes in the concept of God, particularly the unique aspects of monotheistic theology, for instance, God as separate from Creation, God having a “personal” nature, and so forth.

religious cultures in conflict

Armstrong makes theological history simply fascinating. Beginning with the evidence for near-universal worship of a Sky God in prehistory, Armstrong traces the shift from the Sky God to the Earth Mother to polytheism, and then focuses on the revolutionary development of Abraham’s faith in one God which would clash with Canaanite, Egyptian, and Mesopotamian paganism for the next 1500 years. Many Christians interested in objective Biblical scholarship are familiar with the “Documentary Hypothesis” of the Pentateuch stemming from sources J, E, P, and D. Yet never have I seen an attempt to reconstruct the history and interplay of these perspectives throughout ancient Israel and the surrounding regions, and not in my wildest dreams would I have imagined it would be so illuminating…

For instance, Armstrong shows the revolutionary effect of the prophets in Judaism, beginning with Isaiah, at the time when the J and E material was still being written. She shows that prophetic Judaism was an “Axial religion,” a development of the Axial age when cities became the centers of culture in Asia and the Mediterranean. Other Axial religious developments included the teachings of Socrates, Plato, Zoroaster, the Upanishadic sages, the Buddha, Lao-tse, and Confucius. These all taught a universal ethic, insisting that God or the Absolute needed no temple, transcended all, was accessible to or within everyone, and that compassion was the highest virtue.

The prophets’ teaching that “God desires mercy, and not sacrifice,” was in sharp contrast to the priestly, Temple-based establishment, which insisted the Temple was the ultimate dwelling on God on Earth, having chosen the Israel out of all the nations. (This was the beginning of a clash which would endure until John the Baptist and the ministry of Jesus.)

But this is just the beginning. Instead of specializing on a single religion or period in time, Armstrong boldly takes up all the threads of theology throughout the four millennia of the monotheistic religions. With them, she weaves a tapestry of our collective religious experience which can help us understand our faith and ourselves better. Subsequent chapters focus on the life of Christ, early Christian theologies, understandings (and misunderstandings) of Trinity, the influence of Greek philosophy upon Christianity and Islam, mysticism, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, and Fundamentalism.

three persons or three personae?

A special treat is her insight on Trinitarian thought. It was a surprise to learn that the term “persons” in “One God in three Persons” came from the Latin word personae, referring to the masks of characters in a drama. Personae was the Latin translation of the Greek word hypostases, “expressions.”  The different words used in Greek and Latin to describe the Trinity reflected (and influenced) very different understandings of God’s nature. For the Eastern bishops, the Trinity described how One God, whose essence (ousia) is mysterious, ineffable, utterly beyond and above being known or described in any way, imparts his energies (energeia) to Creation through the expressions (hypostases) of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. In other words, the Eastern view of the Trinity reconciled knowledge of God as both personal and beyond personal, knowing and loving in his expressions, and yet beyond any human conception at all in essence. Have you ever heard it like that before?

world-wide paradigm shifts

Brilliant also is her ability to relate the historic phenomena of mysticism, reformation, rationalism, and fundamentalism beyond just the Christian perspective, into a world-wide perspective simultaneously developing in all “the religions of God.” Her revelation that the Reformation was not just a Protestant reformation, but a universal one is a brilliant example. As the printing press spread, the authority of the written word took on unprecedented dimensions. Galileo, she points out, was condemned by the Catholic Church not because his heliocentric universe conflicted with any doctrine or dogma, but because it contradicted an extremely literal reading of the Bible.

Especially helpful is her knowledge about Islamic history with revealing treatments on philosophical and mystical eras in Islam, before the relatively recent phenomenon of Islamic Fundamentalism. It was fascinating to learn that some Sufi schools were so devoted to Jesus that they adapted the Shahada to “there is no God but God, and Jesus is His Prophet.”

Despite five well-earned frims, A History of God has minor but significant flaws: Awkward sentences abound, and her lack of direct experience with conservative American Protestantism makes her disdain for it seem less than objective. Furthermore, errors like “Maurice Cerullo” (i.e. Morris Cerullo) make it feel insufficiently edited, particularly in the age of the Internet. However, none of these are fatal flaws by any means; Armstrong has created a landmark work, undoubtedly unique in its combination of depth and scope. What can I say, but read it!

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This was a worthy read, though I felt I could not pin down precisely where the author’s beliefs lie. There was a great amount of philosophical input (both pro & con), also there was a good amount of information as it related to several differing sects of Christianity, and information concerning the Islamic faith. However, I felt that she was a bit disingenuous with respect to the information presented about the Islamic faith. She had mentioned that Islam was, in essence, a successful coalescing religion which brought together and united the many clans (never once mentioning the warfare onslaught in order to do so, nor any mention of the believe in Allah or die ultimatum.) She touted that there was no compulsion in religion, yet time and again the Quran states (emphatically) or infers that there would be death to the non-believers.

Over all, I thought it was a decent-good read with much unknown information, philosophies, and other religious input. Worthy of the time it took to read. I feel a bit wiser as I understand a few things better, I have been made aware of a few things I didn’t know before, and I understand how others can be misguided as they do not do enough adequate research into their fields of study. They take what is written as truth and leave it there.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Living with Purpose: Devotions for Discovering Your God-Given Potential Kindle Edition by Myles Munroe

living

Inspiration That Will Unlock Your Potential and Release Your Destiny!

You were made for greatness, not mediocrity.

Every human being was formed in the image and likeness of the Creator—a God of purpose and destiny. In turn, it is Heaven’s perfect plan for you to maximize your life, fulfill your destiny and live with a sense of divine purpose!

In the Living With Purpose devotional, you will receive access to Biblical wisdom and spiritual insights that will help you face your day with increased vision and live your life with a greater sense of destiny.

Dr. Myles Munroe was more than a revolutionary ministry leader and bestselling author; he was a prophetic voice who called forth potential in the lives of those to whom he ministered. Through this collection of his timeless teachings on purpose and potential, Dr. Munroe encourages you to dream bigger, inspires your vision, and empowers your potential!

It’s time for you to live with divine purpose!

An inspiring book that will lead you through a biblical journey to search for your specific purpose in this life, in order to glorify God! A worthy and fast read, for certain.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Jesus: Uncovering the Life, Teachings, and Relevance of a Religious Revolutionary by Marcus J. Borg

Jesus Uncovering the Life.png

From top Jesus expert Marcus Borg, a completely updated and revised version of his vision of Jesus—as charismatic healer, sage, and prophet, a man living in the power of the spirit and dedicated to radical social change.

Fully revised and updated, this is Borg’s major book on the historical Jesus. He shows how the Gospel portraits of Jesus, historically seen, make sense. Borg takes into account all the recent developments in historical Jesus scholarship, as well as new theories on who Jesus was and how the Gospels reflect that.

The original version of this book was published well before popular fascination with the historical Jesus. Now this new version takes advantage of all the research that has gone on since the 80s. The revisions establish it as Borg’s big but popular book on Jesus.

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In my opinion, this book is attempting to redefine who Jesus was and what the bible itself, is. Simply put I believe Mr. Borg believes in God, just not the way God is described in the biblical text. I also believe, based upon what I’ve read, that the bible is simply the words of men, metaphorical and not necessarily factual. I was a little disappointed in this book. I do not believe he ever took into account the oral tradition of the Israelites concerning the passing down history from one generation to another. Nor did he seem to take into account the fact that the ancient Greek language does not use quotation marks. Passing on one’s history, culturally through the oral tradition, was, is and always has been that if you maintain the true sense of what your teacher has spoken, you have done your job with honor. Like all other witness accounts, not all will be perfectly matched. However, I believe this book gives one a new perspective on how some people, if not many people, think with respect to God, Jesus, and the Bible.

On a more positive note, I thought Mr. Borg had infused an excellent amount of historical information, culturally and factual, within the confines of these pages. This aided in understanding what was happening at the time, how things were done, the atmosphere of the aristocracy who were in charge at the time (i.e., the Herods of the time.) Well done and worth the read, but be careful what you accept as explanations. By the end of the book I did not know what to think of Mr. Borg on his position about either the bible or Jesus. Although this book was worth the time spent gleaning information from it.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Return to Order: From a Frenzied Economy to an Organic Christian Society by John Horvat

return-order

In times of crisis, we are forced to reexamine our ways and ponder our future. It is in this framework that we need to consider our present economic plight and the charting of our path forward.


In his penetrating analysis of contemporary society, author John Horvat focuses on the present crisis with great insight and clarity. He claims modern economy has become cold, impersonal, and out of balance. Gone are the human elements of honor and trust so essential to our daily lives. Society has discarded the natural restraining influence of the human institutions and values that should temper our economic activities.

Return to Order is a clarion call that invites us to reconnect with those institutions and values by applying the timeless principles of an organic Christian order. Horvat presents a refreshing picture of this order, so wonderfully adapted to our human nature. He describes the calming influence of those natural regulating institutions such as custom, family, community, the Christian State, and the Church.

A return to order is not only possible but crucial. Horvat shows us how to make it happen.

Based on nearly twenty years of ground-breaking research, this book is being recognized as one of the most important and influential on the subject to be published in the past ten years. Its original insight into both the present crisis and remedies for the future thrust Return to Order into the center of the raging debate over how to restore America to prominence as a proud and great nation.

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In my opinion, I thought this an interesting read. However, it seemed as though it were a rendition of Sir Thomas More’s Utopia with the Catholic Church at the center of power. While I thought many ideas were interesting and others were off the handle, so-to-say. While I am a Christian and believe that Jesus IS the head of the church, I have a problem placing the Catholic Church at the seat of power over the people. As such, historically, did not fair very well for the people during the middle ages, as well as, at other times throughout history. Unfortunately, those were “men” who bastardized the words of God and fulfilled such heinous commands.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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The Templars: The History and the Myth: From Solomon’s Temple to the Freemasons by Michael Haag

templars

Arguably one of the most provocative, puzzling, and misunderstood organizations of medieval times, the legendary Knights Templar have always been shrouded in a veil of mystery, while inspiring popular culture from Indiana Jones to Dan Brown. In The Templars, author Michael Haag offers a definitive history of these loyal Christian soldiers of the Crusades—sworn to defend the Holy Land and Jerusalem, but ultimately damned and destroyed by the Pope and his church. A bestseller in the United Kingdom—the first history of the enigmatic warriors to include findings from the Chinon Parchment, the long-lost Vatican document absolving the Knights of heresy—The Templars by Michael Haag is fascinating reading.

A great read of history and intrigue! Worthy of one’s time to learn how lies and power can be the death of  a people and of an institution. We can learn from our history…if we would only pay attention. Discovery of the Chinon Parchment in 2001 hidden in the Vatican Archives proved beyond a doubt that the Templar Knights (institution and the men) were innocent of all the charges brought against them. It was a fight for power between King and Pope.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Life of Martin Luther by John Frederick William Tischer

[DOWNLOAD abridged version]

Luther

A very interesting book on the life of Martin Luther. Yielding a wealth of information on his upbringing, his time in the monastery and his push toward the reformation.

The thing that stands out most to me is the statement he made at the diet at Worms in 1521, when he was asked to recant his books, pamphlets and stances on the doctrines he was promoting:

Unless I am convinced by the testimony of the Scriptures or by clear reason (for I do not trust either in the pope or in councils alone, since it is well known that they have often erred and contradicted themselves), I am bound by the Scriptures I have quoted and my conscience is captive to the Word of God. I cannot and will not recant anything, since it is neither safe nor right to go against conscience. May God help me. Amen.

What daring? What audacity? What courage to speak out at the powers that be (the Romish Church and the pope) letting them know that they were wrong and taught improper and wrong doctrines to the people that followed them. Also, to use the powers at hand in any particular area to use force in order to force others to follow them. This is the power we each need in order to spread the truth. These are the powers we need in order to faithfully follow Jesus’ and hold NO fear of anyone or anything else within our hearts. God will protect our souls, this was a promise; our live He may or may not save from death at any given time. If He does, so be it. If not, then, also, so be it! Let God’s will be done here on earth.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

 

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