Tag Archives: Writing

The Essential Guide to Prayer: How to Pray with Power and Effectiveness by Dutch Sheets

Prayer

Based on years of ministry and experience, international prayer leader and bestselling author Dutch Sheets presents a real-world, hands-on foundation for prayer. With wisdom and practical insight, he helps you develop the core of an effective prayer life: a stronger, lasting relationship with God as Father and friend. He also shows you how to:
· make prayer a vital part of your life
· pray alone and in groups
· persist in prayer until you see God’s answers
· become a powerful intercessor for those you love
· and more!

He even includes questions at the end of each chapter to help you immediately implement what you’re learning.

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An interesting book and helpful as a guide to a point. People seeking these types of guides are seeking a more practical understanding of prayer and applicable concepts and tenets. This book does give interesting adages and ideas for pray, but some of the things are a little outlandish. While if you look through some of the smoke and mirrors…you can see some of the applicable ideas presented. Good book and good read, overall.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Bullies: How the Left’s Culture of Fear and Intimidation Silences Americans by Ben Shapiro

Bullies

From the editor-in-chief of The Daily Wire comes a galvanizing and alarming look at the strategy and tactics of leftist thuggery.

While President Obama and the left like to pretend that they oppose bullying with all their hearts and souls, the truth is far darker: the left is the greatest purveyor of bullying in modern American history. Bullying has morphed into the left’s go-to tactic, as they attempt to quash their opponents through fear, threat of force, violence, and rhetorical intimidation on every major issue facing America today.

Ben Shapiro uncovers the simple strategy used by liberals and their friends in the media: bully the living hell out of conservatives. Play the race card, the class card, the sexism card. Use any and every means at your disposal to demonize your opposition—to shut them up. Then pretend that such bullying is justified, because, after all, conservatives are the true bullies, and need to be taught a lesson for their intolerance. Hidden beneath the left’s supposed hatred of bullying lies a passionate love of its vulgar tactics.

The left has created a climate of fear wherein ordinary Americans must abandon their principles, back abhorrent causes, and remain silent. They believe America is a force for evil, that our military is composed of war criminals, and that patriotism is the deepest form of treason. They incite riots and threaten violence by playing the race card, then claim they’re advocates for tolerance. Disagree with Obama? You must be a racist. They send out union thugs and Occupy Wall Street anarchists to destroy businesses and redistribute the wealth of earners and job creators. No target is off limits as liberal feminists declare war against stay-at-home moms, and gay activists out their enemies, destroy careers, and desecrate personal privacy.

These are the most despicable people in America, bullying their opponents while claiming to be the victims. Shapiro takes on the leftist bullies, exposes their hypocrisy, and offers conservatives a reality check in the face of what has become the gravest threat to American liberty: the left’s single-minded focus on ending political debate through bully tactics.

******

Thought it was very thought provoking and very true in his assessment of how the left is using force to attack opposing ideas. Reminiscent of Hitlerian tactics. Well written and a smooth read. Love Ben Shapiro’s podcast show! He assesses and he analyzes. Is he biased…perhaps, but he is very good at giving an objective view of things from both sided so that you can see where he is coming from logically and reasonably. But you make the choice!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Understanding The Book Of Job – Separating What Is True From What Is Truth by Tom Tompkins

UnderstandingJob

It is safe to say at the very least, that the Bible is a fascinating book. A book full of many true tails, even struggles and disappointments, along with much information intended to help people grow and mature in their relationship with God.

After all, it is impossible to have a positive relationship with someone we have not gotten to know and this principal applies to all relationships including one with God. While there are many ways to get to know our Heavenly Father, reading the Bible is one of the most important tools provided for us. However: many shy away from reading the Old Testament for various reasons, and one reason high on most peoples list is due to the “gloom and doom”.

However, not reading the Old Testament portion of the Bible is similar to using half of the pieces to a 1000 piece puzzle. We will never see the big picture if we only use half of the pieces included. One of the most misunderstood and misused books of the Bible is the book of Job. Yes, the book of Job is filled with suffering and difficult times in the life of Job and his family and friends. In turn the book of Job has become a favorite among many when it comes to dealing with difficult times in their own life or the lives of others.

This particular take, on the book of Job however, is written to help us understand the lessons than can be learned from Job’s life, as well as a better understanding of the character and nature of God Himself, by taking a look at the oldest book in the Bible, from a different angle. When we do so, I believe we will see things we never would have seen without changing the lens we view this incredible story through.

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At points in time it was a tough read, but at other points it was a very easy read. Job is chock full of theological premises to learn from. Some are tougher to glean from the book so you need to read the perspective of other people. Tom Tompkins brought an interesting dimension to the Book of Job. If you enjoy Job, you will enjoy what Tompkins has to add to your understanding. I am not saying you will completely agree with all of his assessments, but they will make you think more objectively!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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The King James Only Controversy: Can You Trust the Modern Translations? by James R. White

KJVOnlyism

Modern Bible translations still come under attack from the King James Only camp. In this revision of a book continually in print for more than ten years, James R. White traces the development of Bible translations old and new, investigating the differences between versions like the NIV, NASB, and NKJV and the Authorized Version of 1611. Written with the layperson in mind, The King James Only Controversy leads the reader through the basic issues of the debate and into the more complex issues of textual criticism. Enlightening reading for all Christians.

The King James Version has been trusted by Christians for generations. Today it’s the center of a debate where critics charge that contemporary translations have changed essential Christian doctrines. In this revised edition of his noteworthy book, James White refutes the claims of those who believe the KJV is the only true translation of the Bible. In addition, White explores the differences between the NIV, NASB, and other translations while addressing some of the complex issues surrounding textual criticism. Sound reading for anyone engaged in, or intrigued by, the “King James Only” controversy.

*****

An excellent read, chock full of well researched information concerning the KJV of the bible, as well as, the newer versions. There are those who truly believe these newer translations are heretical in nature and are of the devil. Where James R. White points out either bad translation or poor choice of translation. He also points out similar concerns with some of the newer translations. James R. White is neither bashing the KJV, nor is he promoting either of the newer translation. But he is defending the position that KJV bible is not the only valid translation. Excellent read and great historical research from all sides.

 

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Winston Churchill: An Informal Study of Greatness by Robert Lewis Taylor

Churchill

Former British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill, led one of the most astonishing lives that public service has ever witnessed.

In An Informal Study of Greatness, Taylor presents the early life of this mythologised and prodigiously talented man.

Focusing on the school years of a young Winston Churchill and the early experiences that shaped his ambition, this fascinating biography delves into the private life of Churchill as a student, a journalist and a soldier.

This a delightful and revealing study of a man who, as Taylor puts it, was one of ‘multiple genius’ and ‘one of the most exasperating figures of history.’

Praise for Winston Churchill: An Informal Study of Greatness

*****

Many things which  you thought you knew about Winston Churchill…you didn’t! A fascinating look into the life of Churchill and his greatness. He was a warrior, a poet, an artist, a politician, and a quick witted individual.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Charles Dickens: A Critical Study by G.K. Chesterton

CD Critical Study

Much of our modern difficulty, in religion and other things, arises merely from this: that we confuse the word “indefinable” with the word “vague.” If some one speaks of a spiritual fact as “indefinable” we promptly picture something misty, a cloud with indeterminate edges. But this is an error even in commonplace logic. The thing that cannot be defined is the first thing; the primary fact. It is our arms and legs, our pots and pans, that are indefinable. The indefinable is the indisputable. The man next door is indefinable, because he is too actual to be defined. And there are some to whom spiritual things have the same fierce and practical proximity; some to whom God is too actual to be defined.
But there is a third class of primary terms. There are popular expressions which every one uses and no one can explain; which the wise man will accept and reverence, as he reverences desire or darkness or any elemental thing. The prigs of the debating club will demand that he should define his terms. And, being a wise man, he will flatly refuse. This first inexplicable term is the most important term of all. The word that has no definition is the word that has no substitute. If a man falls back again and again on some such word as “vulgar” or “manly,” do not suppose that the word means nothing because he cannot say what it means. If he could say what the word means he would say what it means instead of saying the word. When the Game Chicken (that fine thinker) kept on saying to Mr. Toots, “It’s mean. That’s what it is– it’s mean,” he was using language in the wisest possible way. For what else could he say? There is no word for mean except mean. A man must be very mean himself before he comes to defining meanness. Precisely because the word is indefinable, the word is indispensable.
In everyday talk, or in any of our journals, we may find the loose but important phrase, “Why have we no great men to-day? Why have we no great men like Thackeray, or Carlyle, or Dickens?” Do not let us dismiss this expression, because it appears loose or arbitrary. “Great” does mean something, and the test of its actuality is to be found by noting how instinctively and decisively we do apply it to some men and not to others; above all, how instinctively and decisively we do apply it to four or five men in the Victorian era, four or five men of whom Dickens was not the least. The term is found to fit a definite thing. Whatever the word “great” means, Dickens was what it means. Even the fastidious and unhappy who cannot read his books without a continuous critical exasperation, would use the word of him without stopping to think. They feel that Dickens is a great writer even if he is not a good writer. He is treated as a classic; that is, as a king who may now be deserted, but who cannot now be dethroned. The atmosphere of this word clings to him; and the curious thing is that we cannot get it to cling to any of the men of our own generation. “Great” is the first adjective which the most supercilious modern critic would apply to Dickens. And “great” is the last adjective that the most supercilious modern critic would apply to himself We dare not claim to be great men, even when we claim to be superior to them.
Is there, then, any vital meaning in this idea of “greatness” or in our laments over its absence in our own time? Some people say, indeed, that this sense of mass is but a mirage of distance, and that men always think dead men great and live men small. They seem to think that the law of perspective in the mental world is the precise opposite to the law of perspective in the physical world. They think that figures grow larger as they walk away. But this theory cannot be made to correspond with the facts.

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While I found this ebook to be an interesting overview of Charles Dickens’ works, and his methodologies of writing, what he wrote, but it was a hard read; in that, it was a man explaining another man’s works. As that is alright, but it is a man from the 20th century explaining a man from the 19th century, in 20th century terms. This is neither good nor bad…it just is what it is. And while it did touch on Dickens’ past and proclivities, in a sense, it was primarily about his works. It was a good read, a bit tough at times, but it gave one a little background (to some extent) on the man of Charles Dickens. I came away with the notion that Chesterton liked, or even admired Dickens’ works and writing, but he embellished a bit too much with his characters.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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20 Compelling Evidences That God Exists: Discover Why Believing in God Makes So Much Sense by Kenneth D. Boa, Robert M. Bowman Jr.

20CompellingEvidences

Remarkably, even though millions upon millions of us do believe in God, when we are asked why we have such faith, we become tongue-tied and struggle to give a reason for our hope. No wonder those who don’t believe God exists remain unconvinced—there’s too few of us ready to speak on God’s behalf!

Ken Boa and Robert Bowman have provided a resource that tackles the most profound arguments from philosophy, science, sociology, psychology, and history … and presents twenty clear, concise, and compelling evidences that show that faith in God—and specifically Jesus Christ—is reasonable.

*****

An excellent book and an excellent read. You cannot speed read, as you will find yourself slowing down to catch some things. This is an interesting book covering 20 of the most compelling evidences of God’s existence.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

 

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Leading Successful Change: 8 Keys to Making Change Work by Gregory P. Shea, Cassie A. Solomon

Leading

We live in an era where constant change is the norm rather than the exception. Given globalization, increased competition, and constant technological turnover, no organization can run in place: change is not optional. However, the sad fact is that the vast majority of change efforts fail. As authors Gregory P. Shea and Cassie A. Solomon argue, they do not fail for a lack of trying or leadership. Chances are you have led or been part of a failed change. But why did it fail and how can the next change be successfully implemented?

In this essential guide, authors Gregory P. Shea and Cassie A. Solomon deal with the real reasons change efforts fail—and how that failure can be avoided. They argue that change—real change—means changes in behavior and that the work environment itself is the greatest obstacle to making behavioral change stick. They reveal a tested method for leading successful change, which they have developed over a combined 50 years of helping organizations do just that.

In Leading Successful Change, they share the 2 tenets for making successful change; how to create a scene that will provide a vision of the future; the 8 Levers of Change, a tried-and-true method for designing the work environment to support the changes; and how winning companies—from IKEA to a hospital near you—are successfully implementing change.

Change is not optional and it is difficult—but it is also not impossible. Shea and Solomon present a thorough, well-researched explanation of how to make change work.

*****

A very compelling and interesting book on leading people toward change. While primarily geared toward the business arena, it can be used & applied personally. One could almost get over their fear, and dare I say disdain, toward change in their lives and in their work place. Reading this book almost makes it an exciting endeavor to take on. Let’s face it, no one likes change. While it is inevitable, it is still one of those things you hate to encounter. But change happens every day, like it or not!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Flipping the Switch: Unleash the Power of Personal Accountability Using the QBQ! by John G. Miller, David L. Levin

FlippingSwitch

When a light switch is flipped the flow of energy that is released reaches the lightbulb in an instant, bringing it to life. Similarly, asking the right kind of question-a QBQ-is the first step to empowering what Miller calls the Advantage Principles-five essential practices that will lead to a richer experience in every aspect of life: – LEARNING: live an engaged and energized life through positive personal growth and change- OWNERSHIP: attain goals by becoming a solution-oriented person who solves problems- CREATIVITY: find new ways to achieve by succeeding “within the box”- SERVICE: build a legacy by helping others succeed- TRUST: develop deep and rewarding relationships With compelling real-life stories and keen insights, Miller demonstrates how anyone can find success and satisfaction by “flipping the switch.”

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A fantastic read with great insights in order to take your life, business or personal, to a completely higher level than you ever expected possible! Giving great advice on changing the questions you ask of yourself and of others in order to accept responsibility, or placing responsibility squarely where it belongs! We have all learned to great six questions in order to be exceptionally specific in our lives: WHO? WHAT? WHEN? WHERE? WHY? & HOW? But quite honestly, in order to get to that next level we MUST focus on the questions that stem from WHAT? & HOW? These two are the basis of the greatest questions that we can ask of ourselves to achieve greatness in our lives; which, thereby, will aid us to aid others to shoot for the stars and achieve greatness in their own lives!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth by Gordon D. Fee

reading bible

Understanding the Bible isn’t for the few, the gifted, the scholarly. The Bible is accessible. It’s meant to be read and comprehended by everyone from armchair readers to seminary students. A few essential insights into the Bible can clear up a lot of misconceptions and help you grasp the meaning of Scripture and its application to your twenty-first-century life.

More than three quarters of a million people have turned to How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth to inform their reading of the Bible. This fourth edition features revisions that keep pace with current scholarship, resources, and culture. Changes include:

Covering everything from translational concerns to different genres of biblical writing, How to Read the Bible for All Its Worth is used all around the world. In clear, simple language, it helps you accurately understand the different parts of the Bible—their meaning for ancient audiences and their implications for you today—so you can uncover the inexhaustible worth that is in God’s Word.

******

An excellent, I do mean EXCELLENT, primer to aid in your bible study endeavors! Excellent overview as to how to approach, studying, hermeneutics and exegesis of the scriptures and the bible in general. Well, worth the time to read!

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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