Tag Archives: wwii

Jimmy Stewart: Bomber Pilotby Starr Smith, Walter Cronkite (Foreword by)

Overview
Of all the celebrities who served their country during World War II, Jimmy Stewart was unique. At the height of his fame, Jimmy Stewart enlisted in the army several months before the Pearl Harbor attacks woke Hollywood and the rest of the nation to the reality of war. “It’s a true story of personal knowledge,” writes Walter Cronkite in the foreword, “and is told with skill, respect, and admiration.” Author Starr Smith chronicles for the first time Stewart’s long journey to becoming a bomber pilot in combat, including:

· Stewart’s battles with the Air Corps high command
· His assignment to a Liberator squadron in England with the famed Mighty Eighth Air Force
· His twenty combat missions—including one to Berlin—in command of his own squadron in the 445th Bomb Group
· Later, Stewart’s promotion to group operations officer for the 453rd Bomb Group

Jimmy Stewart was a very interesting character, truly his story shows that Hollywood was once a different place with a much different class of people! A worthwhile read which will truly open your eyes about a man who went from thousands of dollars a month to $21/month. And he sought it! A rare breed of person.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Filed under Biographies, Books, eBook, Education, History, Reading, Review, war

The Last Battle by Cornelius Ryan

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The classic account of the final offensive against Hitler’s Third Reich.

The Battle for Berlin was the culminating struggle of World War II in the European theater, the last offensive against Hitler’s Third Reich, which devastated one of Europe’s historic capitals and marked the final defeat of Nazi Germany. It was also one of the war’s bloodiest and most pivotal battles, whose outcome would shape international politics for decades to come.

The Last Battle is Cornelius Ryan’s compelling account of this final battle, a story of brutal extremes, of stunning military triumph alongside the stark conditions that the civilians of Berlin experienced in the face of the Allied assault. As always, Ryan delves beneath the military and political forces that were dictating events to explore the more immediate imperatives of survival, where, as the author describes it, “to eat had become more important than to love, to burrow more dignified than to fight, to exist more militarily correct than to win.”

The Last Battle is the story of ordinary people, both soldiers and civilians, caught up in the despair, frustration, and terror of defeat. It is history at its best, a masterful illumination of the effects of war on the lives of individuals.

Well written and a real mindful captivating read! The atrocities of war and the alliances of perceived friendships, betrayals and the outright blaming and holding accountable for poor leadership!! In the end, Hitler was his own worst enemy who tore down his leadership for not accomplishing his goal of domination because he as the ultimate leader did not supply his military with the necessary tools they needed. GREAT BOOK TO READ, despite it’s age (1966) it is based upon much factually based information believed to have been supplied by Heinrici himself.

Godspeed & Good Reads!

Doc Murf

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Back Door to War: The Roosevelt Foreign Policy 1933-1941 eBook Charles Callan Tansill

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This professionally prepared ebook is an electronic edition of the book that is designed for reading on digital readers like Nook, Kindle, iPad, Sony Reader, and other products including iPhone and Android smart phones. The text reflows depending on your font preferences and it contains links from navigation.

Charles Callan Tansill, one of the foremost American diplomatic historians of the twentieth century, argues that FDR wished to involve the United States in the European War that began in September 1939. When he proved unable to do so directly, he determined to provoke Japan into an attack on American territory. Doing so would involve Japan’s Axis allies in war also, and we would thus enter the war through the “back door”. The strategy succeeded, and Tansill maintains that Roosevelt in accord with it welcomed Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor. The book is based on exhaustive research in the State Department archives.

Publication Information
Westport, CT: Greenwood Press Publishers, 1952.

Just finished and found this to be an excellent primer as to how America created the impetus of our involvement in World War II. Awesome read and full of background information most are unaware of concerning WWII history!

The eBook download

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Flyboys: A True Story of Courage by James Bradley

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This acclaimed bestseller brilliantly illuminates a hidden piece of World War II history as it tells the harrowing true story of nine American airmen shot down in the Pacific. One of them, George H. W. Bush, was miraculously rescued. The fate of the others-an explosive 60-year-old secret-is revealed for the first time in FLYBOYS.

I found this book to be a riveting but grueling account of the island of Chi Chi Jima. The island just north of the infamous Iwo Jima.

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